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COMMONWEALTH OF 
PENNSYLVANIA 
COUNTY ORDAUPHIN 



Magisterial District Number: 12-3-03 
MDJ : Hon. WILLIAM. C. WEN NER 
Address: 5925 STEVENSON AVE, SUITE B 
HARRISBURG, PA 17112 
Telephone: (717)545-0261 




POLICE CRIMINAL COMI 

COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA 
VS. 



DEFENDANT: 
STEPHEN 



RUSSELL 



(NAME and ADDRESS): 
REED 



Middle Name 



First Name 

212 CUMBERLAND STREET 
HARRISBURG, PA 17102 



Last Name 



Gen. 



NCIC Extradition Code Tvae 



03 1-Felony Full 

□ 2-Felony Ltd. 

□ 3-Felony Surrounding States 



□ 4-Felony No Ext. 

□ 5-Felony Pend. 

M A-Misdemeanor Full 



□ B-Misdemeanor Limited 

□ C-Misdemeanor Surrounding States 

□ D-Misdemeanor No Extradition 



□ E-Misdemeanor Pending 

□ Distance: 



Docket Number 

CR-228-15 



GENDER 
E3 Male 
D Female 
RACE 



Date Filed 
07/14/201 



DEFENDANT IDENTIFICATION INFORMATION 



OTN/LiveScan Number 

T 676764-4 



dob 08/09/1949 1 pob SHIPPENSBURG, PA 



Complaint/Incident Number 
43-10.36-13 



First Name 

aka STEVE 

M White 



SID 



Request Lab Services? 

□ YES □ NO 



Add'l DOB / / 



Co-Defendant(s) □ 



Middle Name 



Last Name 

REED ' 



Gen. 



L7J Asian 



I Black 



I Native American 



I Unknown 



ETHNICITY □ Hispanic 



HAIR COLOR 



LTJ Non-Hispanic 



El GRY (Gray) □ RED (Red/Aubn.) □ SDY (Sandy) □ BLU (Blue) 

□ BLK (Black) DONG (Orange) QWHI (White) □ XXX (Unk./Bald) 

□ BLN (Blonde / Strawberry) 



] Unknown 



□ PLE (Purple) 

□ GRN (Green) 



□ BRO (Brown) 

□ PNK (Pink) 



EYE COLOR 



□ BLK (Black) 

□ HAZ (Hazel) 



Driver License. 
DNA 



□ BLU (Blue) 

□ MAR (Maroon) 



State PA 



H BRO (Brown) 
□ PNK (Pink) 



□ GRN (Green) 

□ MUL (Multicolored) 



License Number 14809417 



□ GRY (Gray) 

□ XXX (Unknown) 



Expires: 08/10/2015 



WEIGHT (lbs.) 



□ YES |EI NO 



DNA Location 



150 



FBI Number 



359630FB5 



MNU Number 



Ft. HEIGHT In. 



Defendant Fingerprinted 



□ YES IS NO 



10 



Fingerprint Classification: 



DEFENDANT VEHICLE INFORMATION 



Plate #GB00007 


State 
PA 


Hazmat 
□ 


Registration 
Sticker (MM/YY) 


/ 


Comm'l Veh. ,-, 
Ind. u 


School p-, 
Veh. U 


Oth. NCIC Veh. Code 


Reg. 
same 


VIN 


Year 


Make 

CHEVY 


Model 
EOU 


Style 
SUV 




Color G 


as Def. 
El 



Office of the attorney for the Commonwealth □ Approved □ Disapproved because 



(The attorney for the Commonwealth may require that the complaint, apest warrant affidavit, or both be approved by the attorney for the Commonwealth prior 
to Tilincj. Ss© Ps.R.Crim.P. 507). ' 



DAG CIARKFH MADDFN 



(Name of the attorney for the Commonwealth) 

I, INSPECTOR CRA IG S= LECADRE 

(Name of the Affiant) 





if ' f 

(Signature of the attorney for the Commonwealth) 



(Date) 



of PA OFFICE OF ATTORNEY GENERAL 



(Police Agency ORI Number) 



(Identify Department or Agency Represented and Political Subdivision) 
do hereby state: (check appropriate box) 
1 . M I accuse the above named defendant who lives at the address set forth above 
□ I accuse the defendant whose name is unknown to me but who is described as 



(PSP/MPOETC -Assigned Affiant ID Number! Badge # 

0222400 



□ I accuse the defendant whose name and popular designation or nickname are unknown to me and whom I have 
therefore designated as John Doe or Jane Doe 

with violating the penal laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania a t [ ] 

(suDaivision uoae) (Place-Political Subdivision) 



in DAUPHIN County 



[ 



] 



on or about 



(County Code) 



OPC 412A - Rev. 09/12 



Page 1 of 



Docket Number: 
CR-228-15 


Date Filed: 
07/14/2015 


OTN/LiveScan Number 
T 676764-4 


Complaint/Incident Number 
43-1036-13 


Defendant Name 


First: 

STEPHEN 


Middle: 
RUSSELL 


Last: 
REED 



2. I ask that a warrant of arrest or a summons be issued and that the defendant be required to answer the charges I have 
made. 

3. I verify that the facts set forth in this complaint are true and correct to the best of my knowledge or information and belief. 
This verification is made subject to the penalties of Section 4904 of the Crimes Code (18 Pa.C.S. § 4904) relating to 
unsworn falsification to authorities. 

4. This complaint consists of the preceding page(s) numbered through . 



The acts committed by the accused, as listed and hereafter, were against the peace and dignity of the Commonwealth 
of Pennsylvania and were contrary to the Act(s) of the Assembly, or in violation of the statutes cited. 
(Before a warrant of arrest can be issued, an affidavit of probable cause must be completed, sworn to before the 
issuing authority, and attached.) 



AND NOW, on this date 



(Date) 

July 14, 2015 




(Signature of Affiant) 



I certify that the complaint has been properly completed and verified. 



An affidavit of probable cause must be completed before a warrant can be issued 



(Magisterial District Court Number) 



(Issuing Authority) 




y it. y » 

3 \ mfc 1 -'- - *; 



kQPC 4I2A - Rev. 09/12 Page _ of _ 



Docket Number: 
CR-228-15 



Defendant Name 



Date Filed: 
07/13/2015 



First: 

STEPHEN 



O i N/LiveScan Number 
T 676764-4 



Middle: 
RUSSELL 



Complaint/Incident Number 

43-1036-13 



Last: 
REED 



The acts committed by the accused are described below with each Act of Assembly or statute allegedly violated if 



Inchoate 
Offense 


□ Attempt 

18 901 A 


□ Solicitation 

18 902 A 


□ Conspiracy 

18 903 


□ 
Lead? 


01 

Offense* 


911 

Section 


B (2)(3) 

Siih<5P>rHnri 


of the 


18 CSA 2 F-1 

DA Ctrii, /t:u^\ t_ t_ n». n - — : ' — ■ 


Pen n DOT Data 
(if applicable) 


Accident 
Number 




' □ Interstate 


raae imwl; urtense (Jo 
□ Safety Zone 


de UCR/NIBRS Code 

□ Work Zone 


btatute Description (include the name of statute or ordinance): Corrupt Organizations 








Inchoate 
Offense 


U Attempt 

18 901 A 


□ Solicitation 

18 902 A 


□ Conspiracy 

18 903. 


□ 

Lead? 


02 

Offense* 


5111 

Sfintinn 


A(l)(2) ; 


of th e 


18 CSA 2 F-1 

DA ctnt. /t:m„\ i-* *_ /-\ i_ ~ — _ — : 




PennDOT Data 
(if applicable) 


Accident 
Number 


| 1 n OIOIULC v i 


□ interstate 


urrense uode 
□ Safety Zone 


UCR/NIBRS Code 
□ Work Zone 


Statute Description (include the name of statute or ordinance): Dealing in Proceeds of Unlawful Activities 





Inchoate 
Offense 



□ Attempt 

18 901 A 



□ Solicitation 

18 902 A 



O Conspiracy 

18 903 



□ 



03 



3922 



A(l) 

Subsection 



of the : 



18 CSA 



F-1 



Lead? 



Offense* 
PennDOT Data 
(if applicable) 



Section 



PA Statute (Title) Counts 



Grade 



NCIC Offense Code 



UCR/NIBRS Code 



Accident 
Number 



□ Interstate 



Statute Description (include the name of statute or ordinance): Theft by Deception 



□ Safety Zone 



□ Work Zone 



S . et /° rt ! 1 a ^;ef summary of the facts sufficient to advise the defendant of the nature of the offense(s) charged. A citation to the statute(s) alleqedlv 

violated, without more, is not sufficient. In a summary case, you must cite the specific section(s) and subsection(s) of the statute(s) or ordinancefs) 

Z n P^o^h ,a ♦ e K ag , e ??lt Cti y a U he 'I" 16 ° f the 0ffense may be included if known ' addition, social security numbers and financial information 
(e.g. PINs) should not be listed. If the identity of an account must be established, list only the last four digits. 204 PA.Code §§ 2 13.1 -213 7 

Acts of the accused: : ' " ~ ~ 

1- J-^lu" and , ab0ut diverse dates from December 24 > 1990 tnrau 9 h Jan uary 2010, the Defendant, a person, unlawfully through a pattern of racketeering 
activity that includes but is not limited to acts which are indictable under Chapter 47 (relating to bribery and corrupt influence) and Chapter 39 (relatinq to 
theft offenses), acquired or maintained, directly or indirectly, any interest in or control of the enterprise then known as The Harrisburg Authority On or 
about diverse dates from December 24, 1990 through January 2010, the defendant, a person employed by or associated with the enterprise participated 
either directly or indirectly in the conduct of The Harrisburg Authority's affairs through a pattern of racketeering activities that includes but is not limited to 
acts which are indictable under Chapter 47 (relating to bribery and corrupt influence) and Chapter 39 (relating to theft offenses). 

2. On or about diverse dates from January 1, 2000 through September 7, 2007 the defendant conducted a financial transaction with the knowledge that the 
property involved, including stolen or illegally obtained property, represents the proceeds of unlawful activity, the defendant acted with the intent to promote 
the carrying on of the unlawful activity. On or about diverse dates between May 18 and May 31, 2015, the defendant, conducted a financial transaction 
involving consigning 20 firearms to a retail establishment in Gettysburg with knowledge that the property involved, included stolen or illegally obtained 
property, represented the proceeds of an unlawful act and that the transaction was designed in whole or in part to conceal or disguise the nature location 
source, ownership or control of the proceeds of said unlawful activity by use of monies unlawfully obtained from the City of Harrisburg and the Harrisbura ' 
Authority and by dealing in stolen property obtained with those monies. 

3. On or about September 2003, the defendant intentionally obtained property with a value over $500,000.00 from the Harrisburg School District by 
deception with respect to the closing costs of its 2003 debt offering. On or about various dates from May 2000 toJanuary 2010 the defendant intentionally 
obtained property with a value over $500,000.00 from the Harrisburg Parking Authority by deception by transferring monies into the special projects fund 



>PC 412A ~ Rev. 09/12 



Page of 



lIS POLICE CRIMINAL COMPLAINT 



Docket Number: 
CR-228-15 


Date Filed: 
07/14/2015 


OTN/LiveScan Number 
T 676764-4 


Complaint/Incident Number 
43-1036-13 


Defendant Name 


First: 

STEPHEN 


Middle: 
RUSSELL 


Last: 
REED 



The acts committed by the accused are described below with each Act of Assembly or statute allegedly violated, if 
appropriate. When there is more than one offense, each offense should be numbered chronologically. 

(Set forth a brief summary of the facts sufficient to advise the defendant of the nature of the offense(s) charged. A citation to the sfatute(s) allegedly 
violated, without more, is not sufficient. In a summary case, you must cite the specific sectipn(s) and subsection(s) of the statute(s) or ordinance(s) 
allegedly violated. The age of the victim at the time of the offense may be included if known. In addition, social security numbers and financial-information 
(e.g. PINs) should not be listed. If the identity of an account must be established, list only the last four digits. 204PA.Code§§ 213.1-213.7.) 



Inchoate Q Attempt 
Offense 18 901 A 


□ Solicitation 

18 902 A 


□ Conspiracy 

18 903 


□ 04 3922 


A(l) 


°f the 18 CSA 1 F-3 


Lead? Offense* Section Subsection PA Statute (Title) Counts Grade NCIC Offense Code UOR/NIRRR CndP 


PennDOT Data Accident 
(if applicable) Number 


□ Interstate 


□ Safety Zone □ Work Zone 


Statute Description (include the name of statute or ordinance): Theft by Deception . 


Acts of the accused associated with this Offense: On or about diverse dates between June 2008 and December 2008, the defendant 
intentionally obtained or withheld property of the City of Harrisburg , by deception in an amount in excess of $2,000.00 and less than $100,000.00 with 
respect to invoices submitted for travel reimbursement. 



Inchoate 


□ Attempt 


□ Solicitation 


□ Conspiracy 


Offense 


18 901 A 


18 902 A 


18 903 



□ 


05 


3922 


A(l) 


of the 


18 CSA 


1 


F-2 






Lead? 


Offense# 


. Section 




Subsection 




PA Statute (Title) 


Counts 


Grade 


NCIC Offense Code 




UCR/NIBRS Code 


PennDOT Data 
(if applicable) 


Accident 
Number 




□ Interstate 


□ Safety Zone 


□ Work Zone 



Statute Description (include the name of statute or ordinance): Theft by Deception 



Acts of the accused associated with this Offense: On or about diverse dates between 2004 and December 2008, the defendant intentionally 
obtained or withheld property of the City of Harrisburg by deception in an amount in excess of $100,000.00 and less than $500,000.00 with respect to 
expenses for the National Sports Hall of Fame Foundation. 



Inchoate 


□ Attempt 


□ Solicitation 


□ Conspiracy 


Offense 


18 901 A 


18 902 A 


18 903 



□ 


06 


4701 


A(l) 


of the 


18 CSA 


7 


F-3 


1 "I 
1 


Lead? 


Offense* 


Section 


Subsection 


PA Statute (Title) 


Counts 


Grade 


NCIC Offense Code 


UCR/NIBRS Cotle 



PennDOT Data 
(if applicable) 



Accident 
Number 



□ Interstate 



□ Safety Zone 



□ Work Zone 



Statute Description (include the name of statute or ordinance): Bribery in Official and Political Matters 



Acts of the accused associated with this Offense: On or about diverse dates between October 1999 and December 31, 2003, the defendant 
offered, conferred or agreed to confer upon Richard House the position as "Director of Community Relations" for the Harrisburg Senators Baseball team as 
consideration for the decision, vote, recommendation or other exercise of official discretion by the recipient in a judicial, administrative or legislative 
proceeding. On or about diverse dates between 2003 and December 14, 2005, the defendant offered, conferred or agreed to confer upon (6) members of 
Harrisburg city council a benefit as consideration for their decision, vote, recommendation or other exercise of official discretion by the recipient in a judicial, 
administrative or legislative proceeding. 



KOPC 412A - Rev. 09/12 



Page of 



Docket Number: 
(£-228-15 


Date Filed: 
07/14/2015 


OTN/LiveScan Number 
T 676764-4 


Complaint/Incident Number 
43-1036-13 


Defendant Name 


First: 

STEPHEN 


Middle: 
RUSSELL 


Last: 
REED 



The acts committed by the accused are described below with each Act of Assembly or statute allegedly violated, if 
appropriate. When there is more than one offense, each offense should be numbered chronologically. 

(Set forth a brief summary of the facts sufficient to advise the defendant of the nature of the offense(s) charged. A citation to the statute(s) allegedly 
violated, without more, is not sufficient. In a summary case, you must cite the specific section(s) and subsection(s) of the statute(s) or ordinance(s) 
allegedly violated. The age of the victim at the time of the offense may be included if known. In addition, social security numbers and financial information 
(e.g. PINs) should not be listed. If the identity of an account must be established, list only the last four digits. 204PA.Code §§ 213.1 -213.7.) 



Inchoate 
Offense 



□ Attempt 

18 901 A 



□ Solicitation 

18 902 A 



□ Conspiracy 

18 903 



07 


4113 


A 


of the 


18 CSA 


158 


M-2 







□ 

Lead? 



(if applicable) 



Accident 
Number 



D Interstate 



□ Safety Zone 



□ Work Zone 



Statute Description (include the name of statute or ordinance): Misapplication of Entrusted Property and Property of Government or Financial 
Institutions 



Acts of the accused associated with this Offense: On or about January 2010, the defendant disposed of property of the government (see 
Attachments A, B and C), namely the City of Harrisburg, in a manner which he knows is unlawful and involves substantial risk of loss or detriment to the 
owner of the property or to a person for whose benefit the property was entrusted. 



Inchoate 


□ Attempt 


□ Solicitation 


□ Conspiracy 


Offense 


18 901 A 


18 902 A 


18 903 



□ 


08 


4910 


A(l) 


of the 


18 CSA 


1 


M-2 






Lead? 


Offense* 


Section 




Subsection 




PA Statute (Title) 


Counts 


Grade 


NCIC Offense Code 




UCR/NIBRS Code 


PennDOT Data 
(if applicable) 


Accident 
Number 




□ Interstate 


□ Safety Zone 


□ Work Zone 



Statute Description (include the name of statute or ordinance): Tampering with or Fabricating Physical Evidence 



Acts of the accused associated with this Offense: On or about diverse dates in May 2015, the defendant believing that an official proceeding or 
investigation was pending or about to be instituted, he altered, destroyed, concealed or removed any record, document or thing with intent to impair its 
verity or availability in such proceeding or investigation by attempting to dispose of evidence by commercial sale at a retail establishment in Gettysburg. 



Inchoate 
Offense 


□ Attempt 

18 901 A 


□ Solicitation 

18 902 A 


□ Conspiracy 

18 903 


























□ 


09 


4107 


A (7) 


of .'the; : 


18 CSA 


1 


M-2 






Lead? 


Offense* 


Section 


Subsection 




PA Statute (Title) 


Counts 


Grade 




NCIC Offense Code 


UCR/NIBRS Code 



PennDOT Data 
(if applicable) 



Accident 
Number 



□ Interstate 



□ Safety Zone 



Statute Description (include the name of statute or ordinance): Deceptive Business Practices 



□ Work Zone 



Acts of the accused associated with this Offense: On or about September 2003, the defendant, in the course of business, made or induced 
others to rely on false or misleading written statements with respect to the closing costs of the Harrisburg School District 2003 debt offering for the purpose 
of promoting the sale of securities, or omitted information required by law to be disclosed in written documents related to securities. 



\OPC 412A - Rev. 09/3.2 



Page of 



tO& POLICE CRIMINAL COMPLAINT 



Docket Number: 
CR-228-15 


Date Filed: 
07/14/2015 


OTN/LiveScan Number 
T 676764-4 


Complaint/Incident Number 
43-1036-13 


Defendant Name 


First: 

STEPHEN 


Middle: 
RUSSELL 


Last: 
REED 



The acts committed by the accused are described below with each Act of Assembly or statute allegedly violated, if 
appropriate. When there is more than one offense, each offense should be numbered chronologically. 

(Set forth a £>rfefsummary of the facts sufficient to advise the defendant of the nature of the offense(s) charged. A citation to the stafute(s) allegedly 
violated, without more, is not sufficient. In a summary case, you must cite the specific section(s) and subsection(s) of the statute(s) or ordinance(s) 
allegedly violated. The age of the victim at the time of the offense may be included if known. In addition, social security numbers and financial information 
(e.g. PINs) should not be listed. If the identity of an account must be established, list only the last four digits. 204 PA.Code §§ 213.1 - 213.7.) 



Inchoate □ Attempt 
Offense 18 901 A 


Solicitation □ Conspiracy 

18 902 A 18 903 




□ 10 902 




oftho 18CSA 3 M-2 


Leadr Offense* Section Subsection PA Statute (Title) Counts Grade NCIC Offense Code IICR/NlRRS r.nd 0 


PennDOT Data Accident 
(if applicable) Number 

OJ._i. .J. _ l-v "J.! /• _ I I _ il 


□ Interstate □ Safety Zone □ Work Zone 



Statute Description (include the name of statute or ordinance): Criminal Solicitation 



Acts of the accused associated with this Offense: On or about August 17, 2004, the defendant, with the intent of promoting or facilitating its 
commission, he commanded, encouraged or requested another person to falsify a leave record for Richard Pickles. On or about August 3, 2005, the 
defendant, with the intent of promoting or facilitating its commission, he commanded, encouraged or requested another person to falsify a leave record for 
Richard Pickles. On or about February 12, 2007, the defendant, with the intent of promoting or facilitating its commission, he commanded, encouraged or 
requested another person to falsify a leave record for Richard Pickles. 



inchoate 
Offense 


□ Attempt 

18 901 A 


□ Solicitation 

18 902 A 


Q Conspiracy 

18 903 


























□ 


11 


3925 




of the 


18 CSA 


29 


F-3 






Lead? 


Offense* 


Section 


Subsection 




PA Statute (Title) 


Counts 


Grade 




NCIC Offense Code 


UCR/NIBRS Code 



(if applicable) 



Accident 
Number 



□ Interstate 



□ Safety Zone 



Statute Description (include the name of statute or ordinance): Theft by Receiving Stolen Property 



□ Work Zone 



Acts of the accused associated with this Offense: On or about diverse dates from April 2015 to June 2015, the defendant intentionally received, 
retained or disposed of movable property (see Attachment A) of the City of Harrisburg knowing that it had been stolen, or believing that it had probably 
been stolen. 



Inchoate 


□ Attempt 


□ Solicitation 


□ Conspiracy 


Offense 


18 901 A 


18 902 A 


18 903 



12 


3925 




of the 


18 CSA 


110 


M-l 







□ 

Lead? 



PennDOT Data 
(if applicable) 



Accident 
Number 



□ Interstate 



□ Safety Zone 



□ Work Zone 



Statute Description (include the name of statute or ordinance): Theft by Receiving stolen Property 



Acts of the accused associated with this Offense: On or about diverse dates from April 2015 to June 2015, the defendant intentionally received, 
retained or disposed of movable property (see Attachment B) of the City of Harrisburg knowing that it had been stolen, or believing that it had probably 
been stolen. 



\OPC 412A - Rev. 09/12 Page _ of. 



Docket Number: 
CR-228-15 



Defendant Name 



Date Filed: 
07/14/2015 



First: 

STEPHEN 



POLICE CRIMINAL COMPLAINT 



OTN/LiveScan Number 
T 676764-4 



Middle: 
RUSSELL 



Complaint/Incident Number 
43-1036-13 



Last: 
REED 



The acts committed by the accused are described below with each Act of Assembly or statute allegedly violated, if 
appropriate. When there is more than one offense, each offense should be numbered chronoloqicallv 




(e.g. PINs) should not be listed. If the identity of an account must be established, list only the last four digits. 204 PA.Code §§ 213.1 - 213.7.) 



s) 

information 



Inchoate 
Offense 


□ Attempt 

18 901 A 


□ Solicitation . 

18 902 A 


□ "Conspiracy 

18 903 


□ 

Lead? 


13 

Offense* 


3925 

Section 




of the : 


18CSA 

PA Qfafiifo rnti Q \ 


20 


F-2 







PennDOT Data 


Accident 




^ I lilt;; ouuriis L 

□ Interstate 


araoe noil, unense uo 
□ Safety Zone 


fle UCR/NIBRS Code 


(if applicable) 

o-t-^-t-. .x-. r» :~a!~ _ 


Number 




□ Work Zone 



Acts of the accused associated with this Offense: On or about diverse dates from April 2015 to June 2015, the defendant intentionally received, 
retained or disposed of movable property (see Attachment C) of the City of Harrisburg knowing that it had been stolen, or believing that it had probably 
been stolen. 



Inchoate 
Offense 



□ Attempt 

18 901 A 



£3 Solicitation 

18-902 A 



□ Conspiracy 

18 903 



□ 


14 


3926 




of the . 


18 CSA 


3 


F-3 






Lead? 


Offense* 


Section 




Subsection 




PA Statute (Title) 


Counts 


Grade 


NCIC Offense Code 




UCR/NIBRS Cnrie 


PennDOT Data 
(if applicable) 


Accident 
Number 




□ Interstate 


□ Safety Zone 


□ Work Zone 



Statute Description (include the name of statute or ordinance): Theft of Sen/ices 



Acts of the accused associated with this Offense: On or about May 10-17, 2004, the defendant who had control over the disposition of sen/ices 
of others to which he is not entitled, knowingly diverted the services of Richard Pickles to his own benefit or to the benefit of another not entitled thereto. 
On or about July 8-17, 2005, the defendant who had control over the disposition of services of others to which he is not entitled, knowingly diverted the 
services of Richard Pickles to his own benefit or to the benefit of another not entitled thereto. On or about November 29-December 13, 2006, the defendant 
who had control over the disposition of services of others to which he is not entitled, knowingly diverted the services of Richard Pickles to his own benefit or 
to the benefit of another not entitled thereto. 



1 


inchoate U Attempt 
Offense 18 901 A 


□ Solicitation 

18 902 A 


□ Conspiracy 

18 903 


□ 15 392.1 




of the 18 CSA 29 F-3 




Lead? Offense* Section Subsection PA Statute (Title) Counts Grade NCIC Offense Code UCR/NIRRfi CnrtP 


PennDOT Data Accident 
(if applicable) . Number 


□ Interstate 


□ Safety Zone 


□ Work Zone 


Statute Description (include the name of statute or ordinance): Theft by Unlawful Taking or Disposition 





Acts of the accused associated with this Offense: On or.about January 2010, the defendant exercised unlawful control over movable property 
(see Attachment A) of the City of Harrisburg with the intent to deprive the city thereof. 



tOPC 412A - Rev. 09/12 



Page of. 



£ POLICE CRIMINAL COMPLAINT 



Docket Number: 
GR-228-15 


Date Filed: 
07/14/2015 


OTN/LiveScan Number 
T 676764-4 


Complaint/Incident Number 
43-1036-13 


Defendant Name 


First: 

STEPHEN 


Middle: 
RUSSELL 


Last: 
REED 



The acts committed by the accused are described below with each Act of Assembly or statute allegedly violated, if 
appropriate. When there is more than one offense, each offense shouid be numbered chronologically. 

(Set forth a brief summary of the facts sufficient to advise the defendant of the nature of the offense(s) charged. A citation to the statute(s) allegedly 
violated, without more, is not sufficient. In a summary case, you must cite the specific section(s) and^ubsection(s) of the statute{s) or ordinance(s) 
allegedly violated. The age of the victim at the time of the offense may be included if known. In addition, social security numbers and financial information 
(e.g. PINs) should not be listed. If the identity of an account must be established, list only the last four digits. 204PA.Code §§ 213.1 -213.7.) 



Inchoate □ Attempt 
Offense 18 901 A 


□ Solicitation □ Conspiracy 

18 902 A 18 903 




□. 16 3921 




°f the 18 CSA 110 M-1 


Lead? Offense*- Section Subsection PA Statute (Title) Counts Grade NCIC Offense Code UOR/NIRRS Cndp 


PennDOT Data Accident 
(if applicable) Number 


□ interstate □ Safety Zone □ Work Zone 



Statute Description (include the name of statute or ordinance): Theft by Unlawful Taking or Disposition 



Acts of the accused associated with this Offense: On or about January 2010, the defendant exercised unlawful control over movable property of 
the City of Harrisburg (see Attachment B) with the intent to deprive the city thereof. 



Inchoate 


□ Attempt 


Q Solicitation 


□ Conspiracy 


Offense 


18 901 A 


18 902-A 


18 903 



□ 

Lead? 



x/ 



3921 



of the 



Offense* 



18 CSA 



20 



F-9 



Section 



Subsection 



PA Statute (Title) Counts 



Grade 



NCIC Offense Code 



UCR/NIBRS Code 



PennDOT Data 
(if applicable) 



Accident 
Number 



□ Interstate 



□ Safety Zone 



Statute Description (include the name of statute or ordinance): Theft by Unlawful Taking or Disposition 



□ Work Zone 



Acts of the accused associated with this Offense: On or about January 2010, the defendant exercised unlawful control over movable properly of 
the City of Harrisburg (see Attachment C) with the intent to deprive the city thereof. 



Inchoate 
Offense 


□ Attempt 

18 901 A 


□ Solicitation 

18 902 A 


Q Conspiracy 

18 903 




























□ 








of the 












Lead? 


Offense* 


Section 


Subsection 




PA Statute (Title) 


Counts 


Grade 




NCIC Offense Code 


UCR/NIBRS Code 



PennDOT Data 
(if applicable) 



Accident 
Number 



□ Interstate 



□ Safety Zone 



□ Work Zone 



Statute Description (include the name of statute or ordinance): 



Acts of the accused associated with this Offense: 



\OPC 412A - Rev, OS/12 



Page . of 




POLICE CRIMINAL COMPLAINT 



Docket Number: 

CR-228-15 


Date Filed: 
07/14/2015 


OTN/LiveScan Number 

T 676764^ 


Complaint/Incident Number 
43-1036-13 


Defendant Name: 


First: 

STEPHEN 


Middle: 
RUSSELL 


Last: 
REED 



AFFIDAVIT 'of PROBABLE CAUSE 



Your Affiant, Inspector Craig S. LeCadre, Pennsylvania Office of Attorney General (hereinafter: OAG), being 
duly sworn, deposes and says: 

Your Affiant has been conducting an investigation of allegations of public corruption involving the City of 
Harrisburg and many of it's ancillary governmental entities which includes but is not limited to The Harrisburg 
Authority, former owner of the Harrisburg Resource Recovery Facility (incinerator). The OAG's investigation 
has utilized the 37th Statewide Investigative Grand Jury seated in Allegheny County under Presentment No, 
21, same accepted by order of the Honorable Norman A. Krumencker, III, Supervising Judge. This 
Presentment, attached to this affidavit and incorporated herein by reference, recommends charges to be filed 
by the Attorney General or her designee, against the defendant, Stephen R. Reed. Additionally, there are 
three attachments to this affidavit which are referenced as "Attachments A,B and C", respectively. 

Your Affiant has reviewed the above cited Presentment and having been present at all proceedings, finds 
that the factual findings described therein correspond to the OAG Investigative findings. Your Affiant has 
reviewed the sworn testimony given by the witnesses before the Grand Jury and finds that it is consistent with 
the information contained within the Presentment. Your Affiant has reviewed the evidence presented to the 
Grand Jury and finds that it comports with the results of the OAG investigative efforts and findings as to the 
allegations contained in this instant criminal complaint. 

Your Affiant states that based upon the above facts, there is probable cause to believe that the defendant, 
Stephen R. Reed, committed the acts alleged therein, in violation of Pennsylvania law and respectfully 
requests the issuance of this warrant of arrest. 



I, CRAIG S. LECADRE, BEING DULY SWORN ACCORDING TO THE LAW, DEPOSE AND SAY THAT THE FACTS 
SET FORTH IN THE FOREGOING AFFIDAVIT ARE TRUE AND CORRECT TO THE BEST OF MY KNOWLEDGE, 
INFORMATION AND BELIEF. 



Sworn to me and subscribed before me this 
7/14/15 Date 



14 



day of 



.J. 



My commission expires first Monday of January, 




(Signature of Affiant) 



July 



2015 




.. . 

£ -k si 'jf&x- 



/£- 5? 



'tyfkhTf OF P^,.# 



AOPC 41 1C - Rev. 07/10 



Page 1 of _ 




Attachment A 





One 1876 Winchester action w/Elevator plate engraved 
Spangenberg Tombstone AZ 


$20,000.00 


W 


1995.315.1 




08/18/0.1 


Bronze (Cowboy on Bucking Bronco) 


$19,200.00 


W 


2001.87v3 


4/10/95 


Ford's Theatre Bill, Lincoln's Asassination night 


$14,900 


JNL, WM 


JNv^ WM-UUzl j 


UD/ZD/UU 


opanisn /vimur 


$14,000.00 


W 


2001.23.1 


lyyj 


QinfTl(a r»r\lf 5»f i firvn irl'H "NAflTTplmfl RfiCfl 


$12,000.00 


W 


1995.66.1 


02/01/96 


Set of 4 Stagecoach Harness 


$10,000.00 


W 


1996.14.2a-d 


7/5/1995 


"Lew Wallace Set" 


$8,500.00 


NCWM 


NCWM-00391 


11/01/00 


#10 Saloon; Deadwood, SD Items 


$7,500.00 


W 


2000.101.8 


1 1/01/95 


Anchor described and copy of certif. authenticity 


$7,050.00 


W 


1995.478.1 


11/21/01 


American Made Rev. War Cannon Ca. 1776 30" Unmarked 
Iron Cannon 


$6,500.00 


COL 




08/01/01 


Vampire Hunter's Set 


$6,500.00 


MISC 




03/04/95 


Tombstone Epitaph, June 15, 1880 


$4,900.00 


WA 


1995.62.7 


03/30/02 


Hanging Rope and Knife of S.F. Vigilante Committee 


$4,750.00 


W 


2003.38.9 


09/20/99 


1 890's Large Gaming Wheel 


$4,000.00 


W 


2000.65.146 


.11/12/98 


Morgan Earp Door Frame 


$3,500.00 


W 


1998.88.7 


01/28/97 


Geronimo by Mary E. Fly Tombstone, Arizona Terr 1903 


$3,500.00 


WA 


1997.51.1 


10/01/96 


Union -raciiic iviounxea xvdiigcr dci. \h 


$3,000.00 


W 


1996.101. la-d 


Uo/zo/Uz 


/VGODG VVaUb XVJLlilt/ YV 1LJUL AjCULCJ. vl i- luvwiauvu 


$3,000.00 


W 


2002.213.18 


08/27/99 


1 exas a tar oiui-JWaue ivig 


$3,000.00 


W 


2000.63.18 


A1 /I /) lf\f\ 

01/14/00 


Pistol, Colt, Uug up renc 


$2,800.00 


W 


2000.15.4 . 


05/05/00 


Pharo Table, Portable 


$2,700.00 


W 


zUUU.zy.4 


02/01/96 


All JV1CI3.1 wens rargo r>A.prcbb jdua 


$2,500.00 


W 


1996.14.6 


10/10 /r\ /l 

12/18/94 


bacramento iNewspaper juiy-j-»cu 1001 


$2,500.00 


WA 


1994.8.18 


11/03/98 


L-ium Jxazor ot iviug 


$2,500.00 


W 


1998.89.8 


05/05/00 


Tombstone Tobias Set 


$2,500.00 


W 


2000.29.1 


05/05/00 


Knife, 7th Cav. Little Big Horn Relic 


$2,500.00 


W 


2000.60.12 


11/01/97 


Missouri Convict's letter 


$2,376.00 


WA 


1997.45.8 


08/27/01 


Wells Fargo Knife & Pistol (Smoot) 


$2,200.00 


W 


2001.70.2a,b 


05/05/00 


Cavalry Saddle Set 


$2,000.00 


W 


2000.39.2 



11/01/00 



Wells" Fargo Scales 



$2,000.00 



W 



2000.101.10 



Attachment B 



"-1 - 



08/11/98 


Memoirs of S.P. Allen, 1870-80 under G. Crook 5th Calvary 


$1,900.00 


WA 


1998.44.17 


nc/77/fll 


OalUUU ft 1U OpiLUUH 06 l^llLlL'li.-a-.L/UL.lS. 


<tn snn no 


w 


onni m t-. 


09/24/99 


Bowie Knife, 6th Cavalry 


$1,800.00 


W 


1999.50.2 


07/27/06 


Santiago Nicho 


$1,600.00 


W 


2006.26.2 


08/08/95 


Mexican Colonial Cross 


$1,500.00 


w 


1995.290.3 


08/08/97 


Crystal Palace liquor license 


$1,500.00 


WA 


1997.35.1 


08/30/02 


Ghost Dance Beaded Medicine Pouch & Circular w/Medicine 
Symbols 


$1,500.00 


W 


2002221.13 


08/12/95 


Gun Stock War club 


$1,500.00 


W 


1995.516.31 


08/12/95 


Smith & Wesson Tip up w/bullets 


$1,500.00 


w 


1995.516.63 


08/21/02 


Cross Bow 


$1,450.00 


. w 


2002.215.43 


06/1 






w 
vv 




05/05/00 


Photograph, 5th U.S. Infantry Ft. Keogh, MT Terr. 


$1,350.00 


WA 


2000.31.5 


11/01/97 


Hugh Beckwith Court Findings 


$1,327.00 


WA 


1997.45.6 


11/01/97 


William Rynerson letter 


$1,327.00 


WA 


1997.45.5 


08/17/95 


Cheyenne Indian bag 


$1,300.00 


W 


1995.308.17 


09/01/97 


Indian expedition letter 


$1,238.00 


WA 


1997.31.5 


12/18/94 , 


Sacramento Newspaper Jan- June 1882 


$1,200.00 


WA 


1994.8.15 


12/22/94 


Tombstone Epitaph (19th Century) 


$1,150.00 


WA 


1994.9.13a 


03/21/02 


Apache Holster & Matching Knife Sheath 


$1,100.00 


W 


2002.35.2a ; b 


09/01/97 


election certificate 


$1,054.00 


WA 


1997.31.2 


08/11/98 


7th Calvary Marching Photo 


$1,050.00 


WA 


1998.44.5a 


08/08/97 


Stereoview of Clum & Indians 


$1,000.00 


WA ■ 


1997.35.2 


08/30/02 


Arapaho Fully Beaded Sheath W/Knife (Scarce On Rawhide) 


$1,000.00 


W 


2002.221. 17a,b 


04/11/02 


"Billy The Kid" Circulated Poster 


$1,000.00 


WA 


2002.70.1 


" T 1/03/97 


Sioux Chief Lone Feather, Yellow Bull & Cloud, ca 1875 
albumen 


"K950 00 


w 

VY 


1 997 47 1 


1 1 i(n /on 


Navaj o Chief Manuelito & his Tribe, ca 1865 albumen 








11/12/97 


3 original photographs cl890 of Crow Indians 


$925.00 


. WA 


1997.53. 2a-c 


Uj/UD/UU 


Strong Box, Stage 


tonn nn 


w 




HR/1 1 /Q8 


/ 111 ^alVcUy JT11ULU 




WA 


1 QQQ A A A* 


unk 


Confederate "bowie" marked "CSA" State of Georgia 


$900.00 


NCWM 


NCWM-00264 


11/13/98 


Buffalo Beaded Bag w/pipeknive 


$900.00 


W 


1998.87.2a,b 



11/12/97 


original photograph of outlaw Al Jennings cl915 


$875.00 


WA 


1997.53.4 


07/27/06 


Andirons (3239) 


$850.00 


W 


2006.24.1 


09/24/99 


Bear Head dress 


$850.00 


W 


1999.40.2 


08/05/95 


Smith & Wesson D/A 1st Model "Frontier" 44 cal. marked 


$850.00 


w 


1995.546.9 


no /to inc 

02/ 13/95 


Indian Buffalo Horn Rattle 


$800.00 


w 


1995.33.3 


08/12/95 


Badge US Ind police 


$800.00 


w 


1995.516.52 


02/20/03 


Murdo Police, S. Dakota Fully Beaded Ammo Pouch w/1 890s 
44-40 Pistol Ammo 


$800.00 


w 


2003.7.1 


08/12/95 


Apache Shoulder Bag w/knife 


$800.00 


w 


1995 516 46 


09/04/95 


Stetson Hat in box 


$750.00 


w 


1995335.3 


12/05/02 


Genuine Porter Saddle 


$750.00 


w 


2003.2.1 


05/02/95 


photograph Indian Sky Ranch after Apache Attack, Randall, 
framed 


$750.00 


WA 


1995.144.130 


10/02/98 


1 896 Indian Territory Bill Doolin Gang 


$700.00 


WA 


1998.48.5 


UJ/U3/UU 


Knife, Frontier 


o>/ou.uu 


W 


2000.29.1 / 


11/16/97 


Indian male w/revolver, albumen photo 


$650.00 


WA 


1997.42.3 


. 02/22/02 


Whorehouse Box W/Pinfire Revolver 


$650.00 


W 


2002.36.6 


09/24/99 


Green Chest (#200) 


$637.00 


w 


1999.34.5 


05/05/00 


Dice Drop with old Dice 


$625.00 


w 


2000.47.8 


11/01/95 


Pistol in Book . 


$600.00 


w 


1995.475.17a,b 


09/03/98 


San Francisco Cased Dagger 


$600.00 


w 


1998.41. 2a,b 


10/07/02 


Gambler's Gun 


$550.00 


w 


2002.168.1 


08/11/98 


Crow Foot, Sitting Bull's son, Barry photo 


$550.00 


WA 


1998.44.11 


11/12/97 


2 original photographs of Sioux Indians cl880 


$525.00 


WA 


1997.53.3a,b 


08/08/97 


1898 Al Jennings Signed check (Okla outlaw) 


$500.00 


WA 


1997.83.3 


06/29/95 


Sioux or Cheyenne War Trophy knife 


$500.00 


W 


1995.218.1 


01/28/05 


Original Photo Roswell, NM/Gen; Lee 


$484.16 


W 


2005.11.24 


09/01/97 


Mormon polygamy letter 


$478.00 


WA 


1997.31.6 


05/05/00 


Photograph, Bill Dalton & Marshall Lidsey 


$450.00 


WA 


2000.44.4 


08/20/01 


Sombrero w/Silver Hat Band 


$450.00 


W 


2001.80.5 


07/06/01 


Bedu Mask - Gurunsi Tribe, Rep of Upper Volta 


$450.00 


AFAM 


City list 



02/01/96 


Wells Fargo Mail Bag 


$400.00 


W 


1996.14.5a,b 


02/01/96 


Wells Fargo MaiLBag 


$400.00 


W 


1996.14.5a,b 


07/27/05 


Rug, Two Grey Hills 


$400.00 


W 


2005.36.38 


11/14/98 


Platform scale*? w/weitrlifc 




w 


19yd.94.30 


10/01/95 


Indian beaded holster for colt lightning pistol 


$400.00 


W 


1995.416.9 


08/08/95 


Possee photo 


$400.00 


' WA 


1995.292.28 


11/01/97 


1 865 Kansas Letter 


$397.00 


WA 


1997.45.4 


09/20/99 


Green Spitoon from Oriental Saloon in Tombstone 


$385.00 


W 


2000.65.138 


08/11/98 


Cody Fire Dept w/Buffalo Bill 1907 


$375.00 


W 


1998.44.9 


05/02/95 


photograph, Railroad track laying crew, Hienze photo, framed 


$375.00 


WA 


1995.144.78 


11/01/97 


TnHinTi-A/TiTii'no' navrnll 

XLlXXlaU iTXJJJLLllg UajL\Jli 


3>JO /.UU 


WT A 

WA 


1997.45.7 




Newspaper, Daily Denver Times, July 19, 1881 "Billy The 
Kid" 


(Jio s~ r i\f\ 

$365.00 


WA 


1995.97.2 


08/21/02 


Texas Fighting Knife 


$360.00 


W 


2002.172.20 


10/U3/06 


Cowboy Bathtub 


$350.00 


W 


2006.47.8 


05/05/00 


PTlftfoPT?ir>fi T.Jiwtnari R Kwinor w/Rnrlv < 


CQ<n fin 


WA 


OAAH A A 1 c 

2000,44.15 


,11/16/97 


Albumen 3 Apache women photo 


$325.00 


WA 


1997.42.1 


11/16/97 


Indian women w/child by Parker/photo 


$325.00 


WA 


1997.42.5 


03/01/02 


Copper Ladle 


$318.75 


W 


2002.43.2 


01/15/03 


Childs Bath Tub From Westcliff Ranch 36" 


$300.00 


W 


2003.43.20 


03/01/02 


Iron Bell 


$300.00 


W 


2002.53.20 


08/15/97 


Photo of Indian Burial Ground w/discount 


$300.00 


WA 


1997.85.1 


05/05/00 


Stereoview, T. Roosevelt on Horseback 


$300.00 


WA 


2000.44.18 


. 09/08/01 


Beaded Skull 


$300.00 


W 


2001.106.2 


05/05/00 


Photograph, Framed, Conway, Texas 


$300.00 


WA. 


2000.59.37 


05/02/95 


photograph Ft. Grant, AZ framed 


$300.00 


WA 


1995.144.132 


08/20/01 


U.S. Whiskey Flask 


$295.00 


W 


2001.97.1 


05/02/95 


newspaper, Tombstone epitaph, (sm) framed 


$285.00 


WA 


1995.144.167 


08/29/00 


Hanging Lamp Glass Painted Shade 


$275.00 


W 


2000.111.86 



08/11/98 


Chief & Son, Barry photos &mat 


$275.00 


WA 


1998.44.10 


08/05/95 


Wells Fargo Corp. Stamp/Seal, prints Exp. San Fran, CA 


$275.00 


W 


1995.546.10 


10/01/95 


Geo. Mason 


$250.00 


WA 


1995.391.43. 


.08/11/98 


Sitting Bull Camp Ft. Randall stereo 


$250.00 


WA 


1998.44.14 


08/25/02 


Custer Postcard Series 


$250.00 


WA 


2002.230.10 


11/01/97 


Governor's Rifle Duel letter 


$227.00 


WA 


1997.45.3 


11/16/97 


Cabinet Card Apache Squaw 


$225.00 


WA' 


1997.42.2 


11/16/97 


Two Indian men, no Photo I.D. 


$225.00 


WA 


1997.42.4 . 


03/04/96 


letter-Indian Fighter Geo. P. Buell Ft. Stanton 1881 


$225.00 


WA 


1996.28.2 


11/01/97 


US Commissioner's Complaint 


$217.00 


WA 


1997.45.2 


11/01/97 


Arizona Territory Court Document 


$217.00 ^ 


WA 


1997.45.1 


08/19/01 


19th Cent. Childs High Chair (Payson, AZ) 


$215,00 


W 


2001.78.10 


07/27/06 


Yarn Winder (2813) 


$200.00 


W 


2006.24.4 


08/25/02 


Ferrier Tool Box 


$200.00 


w 


200333.3 


10/02/98 


1 884 Fort Stanton Broadside 


$200.00 


WA 


1998.48.9 


05/05/00 


"Photograph, Central City 


$200.00 


WA 


2000.61.14c 



T 



Attachment C 



02/22/02 


Russian Miquelet 


$4,800.00 


W 


2002.36.1 


06/01/95 


Rifle, 1873 Winchester 


$450.00 


W 


1995.175.35 


11/01/95 


Indian Scout rifle in scabbard 


$2,450.00 


W 


1995.475.7a,b 


06/29/95 


1894 Winchester 38-55 made in 1898 


$1,000.00 


W 


1995.218.2 


08/14/95 


1884 Springfield (Indian) 


$5,000.00 


W 


• 1995.303.4 


12/09/95 


Winchester 94 Indian Gun 


$900.00 


W 


1995.512.6 


07/11/95 


Colt lightning 41 cal. w/holster 


Lot 


W 


1995.243.4a,b 


08/05/95 


bmitn & Wesson D/A 1st Model rrontier 44 cal. Marked 
Wells Fargo- 


$850.00 


w 


1995.546.9 


01/12/97 


Gunfighter's Remington Pistol (David Rudabaugh) 


$1,600.00 


w 


1997.61.4a 


08/05/95 


Winchester 1873 carbine 44 cal. 20" bar. Marked Wells Fargo 


$1,700.00 


w 


1995.546.8 


01/11/95 


Remington Pistol w/Holster & belt 


$1,400.00- 


w 


1994.20.3 


06/27/00 


Flintlock Jf istol - Ojibuay/Lakota. Wars 


$1,250.00 


w 


2000.80.1 


US/Z //yy 


Meeker Massacre Rifle, Sharps (Relic) 


JLOt 


w 


2000.63. la 


08/10/95 


Double Barrel Pin Fire 


$500.00 


w 


1995.294.6 


02/26/02 


Cheyenne Scabbard, w/ Musket 


$3,500.00 


w 


2002.139.24a,b 


11/20/01 


Robbers Shotgun & Case 


$1,500.00 


w 


2002.134.3 


03/10/95 


Sioux beaded bar, 1873 Winchester (silver inlaid) Appache 
scabbard,etc 


$4,000.00 


w 


1995.543. la,b 


03/27/97 


Early 19th Cent Rifle & powder horn 


$1,275.00 


w 


1997.17.1a,b 


09/04/95 


Leman Indian trade rifle 


$4,500.00 


w 


1995.335.30 


10/03/06 


Rifle, Model 73 Winchester 44-40 


$2,800.00 


w 


2006.47.4 



INTRODUCTION 

We, tfcermembers of the Thirty-Seventh Statewide Investigating Grand Jury, having 
received and reviewed evidence regarding" allegations of violations of the- Pennsylvania Crimes 
Cade and related laws, occurring in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, pursuant to Notice of 
Submission of Investigation Number 11, do hereby make the following findings of fact 
■conclusions, and recommendation of charges. 

FINDINGS OF FACT 

This investigation was- commenced upon a conflict referral from the Dauphin County 
District Attorney's Office. It concerned allegations of potential criminal misconduct with 
respect to the financing, operation, and management of the Harrisburg Resource Recovery 
Facility.or what has-popularly become known as the "incinerator." Over time, this Grand. Jury's 
inquiry broadened in scope to receive and consider evidence of misconduct in- the administration 
of other Harrisburg municipal entities and by officials of the Harrisburg City government. 

Much has been written elsewhere about the public debt crisis which resulted from the 
decision by Harrisburg City, Dauphin County, and state public officials, to encumber the region 
through serial issuance of public debt in the forlorn hope of transforming the 'incinerator' into a 
profitable enterprise. The Forensic Audit prepared for the Harrisburg Authority comprises a 
thoughtful and, this Grand Jury finds, accurate exegesis of the incinerator project. 

This Grand Jury, however, finds that the root causes of this crisis were endemic to 
Harrisburg city government itself at the time. The misguided decisions which later became 
criminal miscpnduct are visible in a number of civic institutions which this Grand Jury has 
studied. 

4 



The scope and complexity ofthis investigation make precis difficult but, in short, this 
Grand Jury 'finds that then Mayor Stephen Reed, abetted by associates in government and the 
professional community, exploited the availability of capital in the municipal debt market to 
raise money for purposes utterly unrelated to the civic project for which a given bond was issued. 
In other- words, in every instancethis Grand Jury examined, Reed and his associates marketed 
and sold bonds for one purpose, such as retrofitting the incinerator or renovating schools, then 
diverted at least some of those proceeds to buy things-in which Reed was interested and to create 
fees payable to a coterie of professionals. 

This model of the issuance of public debt for one purpose and the expenditure of 
proceeds on totally unrelated goods and services appears in not just the former Harrisburg 
Authority, but in the Harrisburg School District, -the Harrisburg Civic Baseball Club, the 
Harrisburg University of Science and Technology, and other municipal enterprises. Each was 
exploited to raise capital ostensibly necessary for a legitimate purpose and each was damaged 
under the crashing weight of the debt incurred in its name. It is the investigation ofthis engine 
of debt which drove the City of Harrisburg inexorably into receivership, and Stephen Reed's role 
in fueling it, which is the subject of this presentment: Accordingly, the instant presentment is 
addressed to the alleged criminal misconduct of Stephen Reed only. This "presentment is issued ' 
in furtherance of the Thirty-Seventh Statewide Investigating Grand Jury's ongoing investigation 
into allegations of misconduct by those named herein and others as yet unnamed. 

This presentment will address the role of each municipal entity in what became the 'Reed 
model' of the misuse of public debt and other public funds. Additional findings of fact and a 
recommendation of criminal charges follow. 



5 



Stephen Reed graduated from Bishop McDevitt High School in Harrisburg in 1967. He 
attended Dickenson College but left off his studies prior to graduation in "favor of pursuing a 
career in politics. 

In 1974, when he was only 25 years old, Reed won a seat in Pennsylvania's House of 
Representatives. He served three terms there before departing in 1 980. 

In 1981, Reed waselected Mayor of the City of Harrisburg, an office he would hold 
without interruption or meaningful opposition until January 4, 201 0. A dynamic and forceful 
personality, Reed would come to exercise near absolute control over the offices and institutions 
of the city he governed. 

Undoubtedly, Reed did much that was good for the City of Harrisburg_and its residents. 
This Grand Jury finds however -that, over time, the prudent stewardship and innovative thinking 
which Reed brought to his office early on gave way to a use of public money and other resources- 
to gratify his own interests at the city's expense. 

I. "INCINERATOR" AND THE HARRISBURG AUTHORITY 

In December of 1993, the City of Harrisburg sold the Resource Recovery Facility, 
hereinafter referred to as the incinerator, to a municipal entity called The Harrisburg Authority. 

Thomas Mealy, one time executive director of The Harrisburg Authority testified before 
this Grand Jury. He was appointed to that position by Stephen Reed in 1990. The Authority 
began as a mundane municipal entity overseeing traditional city utilities such as sewer and water. 
Under Reed's control, the scope of the Authority's portfolio would swell to include 
administration of the incinerator and participation in the issuance of public debt on behalf of the 



6 



Harrisburg School District, Harrisburg University of Science and Technology and in other 
municipal finance transactions. . 



Organizationally, Mealy testified the Authority's board of directors comprised five 
individuals who were all appointed by then Mayor Reed. They served terms of either two or four 
years. 

Mealy testified that in 2Q00 or 2001 the Authority began to divert money into a "special 
project fund" the idea of which was to bring in "non-Harrisburg money" to be used and spent on 
improving city services. Mealy indicated that some of the initial projects paid for by this fund 
included installing lights on the Walnut, Street Bridge and creating a rorrning trail on City Island. 
Mealy testified that over time Reed became more "aggressive" with the use of money from this 
fund. Specifically, Reed used it to purchase antiquities and Mealy testified that the Board would 
entertain requests by Reed to use Authority money-for that -purpose 1 . 



1 Reed had indicated to the Harrisburg Authority through a memo that "the law 
does not prescribe any particular manner in which such funds should be- 
utilized". This notion is incorrect. To the extent money in the Special 
Projects Reserve Fund is money of THA, the Municipality Authorities Act 
expressly prescribes: i) permitted usage - t.o include .acquisition of- land, 
structures, equipment, and facilities and improvements thereto, and ii) . 
permitted projects and purposes for which money can be spent - to include 
water, sewer, storm water, parking, airports, ' incinerators, schools and 
healthcare facilities (nowhere is acquisition of museum' artifacts mentioned 
as a proper use, purpose or project of a municipal authority) . Moreover, the 
Authority, like the City was subject to competition in award of contracts and 
these provisions at the time would have applied to any contract for purchase 
with a cost of over $10,000 per Section 5614 (that is, had the acquisition of 
an artifact with THA or City money been legal in the first instance) . To 
the extent that money in the Special Projects Reserve Fund was money of the ■ 
City, the City Charter and applicable State law have bidding requirements and 
would require that such amounts are properly budgeted and • appropriated by 
City Council . 



7 



The city sold the incinerator to the Authority at a time when the EPA introduced more 
stringent regulations of waste to energy facilities like the incinerator. It became clear it would be 
necessary either to close the incinerator or to spend a great deal of money to retrofit it to bring it 
into compliance, with federal law. 

In 1993, the Harrisburg Authority purchased the incinerator from the City of Harrisburg 
for $26.7 million dollars. As the forensic audit for the Harrisburg Authority noted, that purchase 
was made entirely with borrowed money. It was necessary to borrow an additional $7.5 million 
dollars at the same time bringing the 1993 purchase price, all of which was borrowed, to $34.2 
million. ... 

In 1996 and 1997, it was necessary to borrow $3.5 million and $10.9 million respectively. 
Millions of dollars of that aggregate borrowing were consumed by -a working capital deficit 
signifying that the revenues generated by the incinerator were not sufficient to pay the expenses. 

In 1998, it was necessary for the Authority to issue close to $56 million dollars in debt 
which purported to refinance the 1993 and 1997 borrowings. Far from generating revenue or 
cutting expenses, this borrowing was necessary to prop up' the operation of the facility with ever 
increasing borrowing at increasing cost to incinerator operations. Again, in 2000, the Authority 
issuecLanother $25.2 million dollars' worth of debt to restructure prior borrowing and to back fill 
the hole which the previous bond issues had created. Despite the self-evident need for every 
available dollar to go to debt service and operations, $4.2 million dollars more in debt was 
incurred in 2000 and diverted to the City of Harrisburg as a "guaranty fee." This "guaranty fee" ■ 
was created and sized to fill a budget deficit in the City of Harrisburg' s General Fund. This 
Grand Jury finds that this fee was disproportionate to the value of the guaranty, and a clear 

8 



example of Reed taking bond proceeds from one bond issue and using them for a -purpose that 
Reed believed would be beneficial to him. The incinerator could, ill afford this additional debt 
constituting the guaranty fee bonds and this is an instance of exploitation of the municipal bond 
market by Reed. 

In 2002, still more debt was issued, ■ and the- Authority offered $ 1 7 million dollars of 
additional bonds for sale. The vast majority of bond proceeds' from this offering had to be 
expended- as working capital. By this time, the incinerator was producing nothing but additional 
debt, and each bond issuance forged a new link in the chain of debt wrapped around the city and 
which the city still drags behind it to this day. 

But the worst was yet to come. In 2003 the Authority issued Series A, B and C notes of 
2003 for a total amount of almost $76 million dollars. Like paying one credit card with another-, 
the massive 2003 issuance accomplished little more than kicking the can down the road at great . 
expense to incinerator operations. This borrowing pushed principal out into the future so that 
THA was able to make interest payments on the prior debt. 2 As the forensic audit noted, by this 
point in 2003 the incinerator was carrying almost $ 1 05 million dollars' worth of debt. The 
Authority issued still more debt, comprising its D, E and F series of 2003 which encumbered the 
facility with a spectacular additional $125 million dollars' worth of debt. It was from this 
malignant mass of debt that Reed picked "fees" .to be spent on artifacts and curiosities. 

By the end of 2006, things had gone from bad to worse at the incinerator. The task of 
retrofitting the incinerator to make it fall in line with EPA standards had fallen far short of 

2 The expense of this, and other, municipal debt offerings and their 
certification. as "self-liquidating" to the 'Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and 
to the investors to whom the bonds were marketed, is the' subject of an 
ongoing investigation by this Grand Jury. 

9 



projection and the Authority was faced with needing to raise an estimated of $25.5 million to 
complete the project. This coupled with the fact that the Authority had debt service and swap 
payments due in 2007 that totaled $13 .4 million, made it clear to the Authority that additional 
debt would have to be issued in order to save the project and prevent further financial ruin for the 
city of Harrisburg. 

At this same time, Reed was attempting'to hash out the terms of the borrowing in such a 
way that the city of Harrisburg and county of Dauphin would be on board and willing to 
guarantee the loans. 

A city council woman from 2001-2009, testified that the city council was not in favor of 
the 2007 borrowing. CouncilTiad come together and drafted a set of 15 conditions that had to be 
met prior to them voting to approve the borrowing. One of the conditions was that none of the 
professionals that were paid on the first round of borrowings could be used this time around. 
This condition- was ultimately removed due to the former special projects advisor and a senior 
counselor to Reed tlreatening to sue her for tortious interference with contract. Some of the 
other conditions -included reducing the working capital amount, repaying the city for the 
guarantee payment that it had made on June 1 , firing all -individuals connected with the Barlow 
retrofit, replacing the Authority board, an agreement from the Authority board that it would 
attempt to sell the facility on or before July 1, 2009, and hiring individuals to perform a forensic 
audit of the project. 

Dauphin County had its own list of conditions that had to be met before they would 
guarantee the debt as well. Some of the conditions included that it would receive all money that 
was past due to it and its professionals from the working capital loan that was a part of the 



10 



. borrowing, that the working capital loan would be for no more than $30 million and that the debt 
-would be restructured prior to June 30, 2009. Jeff Haste, a Dauphin County Commissioner since 
2003 testified before the Grand Jury. He recalled the discussions leading up to the "2007 
borrowing as being very difficult. "I remember sitting in the meeting being very frustrated, and I 
made a comment, and this still holds true today. I felt that the County was almost like that Coast 
Guard rescue person that we had jumped into the waters to save the City, to swim with them to ' 
shore. You know, again, financially that's what we were doing to try to save them, and we 
weren't told the whole story. And I remember stating at that time when we had to make a 
decision in '07, do we continue to try on our missiomand swim to shore with the City -or do we 
just say it's tune to sink and drown." 

Ultimately, both the City and County were able to reach a compromise whereby they - got 
some of their conditions met and, in return, agreed to act as a guarantor for the 2007 borrowing. 

Bernadette Barattini, the attorney for the PA Department of Community and Economic 
Development who administers the Local Government Debt Act which includes the certification 
of debt as self-liquidating, testified before the Grand Jury. She indicated that it would have been 
"problematic" to certify the existing debt as self-liquidating if all of the projections that were 
prepared indicated that the incinerator would not be able to produce sufficient revenue to pay for 
past bonds let alone the new ones being issued. She stated if this was the case, the self- 
liquidating certification should have been changed to indicate only the amount of the debt that 
could be paid for by reasonable projections of revenue. 

In an effort to proceed with the issuance of new debt, the Authority asked multiple parties 
to prepare projections of the expected operations for the incinerator for the period 2007 through 



11 



201 1 . All but one of the projections" 3 indicated that the Authority would be unable to service the 
current debt for the facility, let alone any new debt that would be issued. In spite of this dubious 
forecast, the Authority went ahead" with issuing the debt and all parties to the borrowing still 
signed the form, certifying all of the previous debt as self-liquidating. 

On December 26, 2007, the Harrisburg Authority issued the 2007 CNote for 
$20,961,574.40 and D Note for $9,033,234.45. Included in the closing documents was a 
reference -to the Tri Party Interim Funding Agreement which was drafted to prevent Covanta 
from terrninating its services. The agreement included the Authority, the city and the county and 
provided that the Authority would make a payment of $800,000 to Covanta, the- city would make 
a payment of $250,000 to Covanta and the County would make a payment of $2.25 million to 
Covanta. The money paid by theXity and County would be reimbursed to them through the 
2007 "borrowing, effectively paying them back for having te make payments that they were 
contractually obligated to make, as guarantors of the previous loans. 

The 2007 Notes also included payments outstanding to Covanta as well as' the monies 
that would be owed to Covanta in 2008 totaling $5,716,728.55. Aside from that amount, the 
remainder of the money that was acquired through the borrowing was spent to pay past debts, to 
cover upcoming debt service payments and to pay the professionals who put together the deal. 
There was a $3,456,097.99 payment to the City of Harrisburg- to reimburse it for a June and 
September debt service payment. The Notes were, also used to repay the city and county for debt 
service payments" that were coming due in November and December of 2007 as well as to cover 
the payments that were due in 2008, totaling $14,220,927.86. There was also a $1,067,783.00 

3 The one projection was stale, based upon facts that were known to have 
changed well before issuance of the debt, and did not contain the information 
generated by experts on which the bond professionals ultimately relied. 

12 



reimbursement to the County for fees that the Authority had collected on its behalf and had failed 
to remit for 2006 and 2007. Finally, there was '$1,222,671. 12 in legal and financial fees that 
were tied to the borrowing that were also paid from the Notes. 

Although he was the executive director of the Harrisburg Authority, Mealy could not 
explain how the Authority became entangled in so many different municipal transactions, so 
many of which seemed plainly outside the scope of the Authority's institutional- expertise. For 
example, $77 million dollars of debt was issued by the Authority on behalf of the school district 
of the City of Harrisburg. The official statement provided with respect to that debt issuance 
announces the purpose of the bond float as follows "the bonds are being issued to provide funds 
that will be used, together with certain other available funds, to finance a project of the school 
district consisting of (i) the financing of various capital projects of the school district ("the 
capital projects"); (ii) the current refunding of the outstanding amount of the school district's 
general obligation notes . . . ; (iii) the funding of capitalized interest on the bonds; (iv) the-payment 
of the costs of issuance of the bonds." Although investors were told that proceeds of this bond 
issue would be spent on the improvement of the schools of the City of Harrisburg for the benefit 
of its students; Reed took more than half a million dollars to buy Wild West and other curiosities. 

Reed himself, in a memorandum dated September 21, 2003 to Thomas Mealy then the 
Executive Director of the, Harrisburg Authority candidly announced the purpose of the 
"administrative fee." In a thirteen (13) line memo attached to a thick stack of artifact invoices, 
Reed informed Mealy that the balance in the "Special Account" had dwindled to $8,783 .97. 
"With the closing on September 23 rd of the THA bonds," Reed told Mealy "there will be an 
additional $5 15,000.00 added.". That money would not long remain in the "Special Account," - 
because Reed simultaneously presented to Mealy close to half a million dollars' worth of artifact " 

13 



invoices which he instructed Mealy are to be paid the day after the bond closing. From the 
nearly $550,000.0.0. syphoned into the Special Account from the school district of Harrisburg, 
only $56,000.00 by Reed's own account .would be left after payment of the "already pending" 
orders for curiosities. 



As part of that transaction, Authority board member Frederick Clark moved that the 
Authority take a $5 1 5,000 "administrative fee" 4 from the issuance of 77 million dollars of 
Harrisburg School District debt and move it into a special projects fund. Mr. Mealy had no. idea 
what role the Authority could have played in a refinancing, done by the Harrisburg School 
District that would justify a fee of more than a half a million dollars. Mealy testified that 
Stephen Reed or "the other two that I mentioned," referring to a senior counselor to Reed, and a 
former special projects advisor, would tell him, what amount the Authority fee would be.- The 
Grand Jury wishes to emphasize this is the first, but by no means the only, instance in which a 
witness In a position of authority testified that Reed would dictate the particular terms of a 



4 Such an amount is largely outside the bounds of the traditional fee charged 
by a conduit issuing authority.' Some other examples of" administrative fees 
that are typical. in this area include: 

a. City of York General Authority. This authority was used by the 
School District prior to Stephen Reed's control of the board for a borrowing- 
in 1999. Their fee on an $80 million transaction was $75,000.00, 
approximately 68 6% lower than what the School District was required to pay to 
THA in 2003. 

b. State Public School Building Authority. For the past 10 years 
or so, issuing through this authority has been relatively inexpensive and 
today, it is free of cost to the borrower. When the School Board was given 
a choice, it availed itself to this low cost option and on a borrowing of 
very similar size ($77 million)- paid $12,500 or, 4> 120% less than the' School 
District, paid THA. in. 2003. 

c. Dauphin County General Authority. This Authority charges a flat 
fee based upon size of the transaction and complexity. In 2010, in 
connection with a continuing care retirement community (considered more 
complex than a school district financing) DCGA charged $25,000 which was also 
intended to cover legal costs of the DCGA. Another general authority in 
Pennsylvania (Delaware County General Authority) for this sized transaction 
would have also charged $25,000 according to its published fee schedule.' 



14 



financial transaction into which city entities under his control would enter. This extended to 
. dictating the actual amount of the fee in this instance. It is- self-evident that this fee cannot have 
been related to services performed by the Authority where the amount of that fee is not 
determined by the labor of Authority employees but is rather declared by the Mayor. 
Professionals retained by the Authority , such as Authority legal counsel and a financial advisor, 
who did employ labor on behalf of the Authority were-paid separately by the School District 
from proceeds of the bonds. ' 

At that very same September of 2003 meeting, the Board voted to pay $47 1 ,506.00 worth 
of artifacts payments to various antiquities dealers. Reed would simply submit requisitions for 
payment and, Mealy testified, the Authority would then vote to approve payment. Then Grand 
Jury notes that the amount of the reimbursement correlates to the amount of the Authority's 
'fee.' ■ . . 

This was not the only such fee taken. In a November 2002 letter, Reed told Mealy to 
expect money from the Parking Authority and from the school district and directed that those 
funds should be moved into the special projects fund. In a review of the city special projects 
fund revenue from 2000-2005, it is notable that large sums of money flow into the fund from the 
Harrisburg Parking Authority, beginning with a deposit of $ 1 .3 million on May 5, 2000. On 
August 3, 2001, there is $750,000.00 that makes its way into the special projects' fund from a 
series of bonds issued on behalf of the Parking Authority. October 9, 2001, there is an additional 
$973,000.00 that is deposited into the special projects fund for what is noted to be the 7 th Street 
Garage sale. Less than three months after this deposit of close to $1 million, the fund was down 
to a balance of $4,456.64 and an additional $175,000.00 was deposited for the remainder of the 
7 th Street Garage sale on December 27, 2001. Again on February 28, 2003 $250,000.00 makes 

15 



its way. into the fund from the Parking Authority. An additional $500,000.00 is deposited on 
April' 3, 2003 and another $170,130.00 is deposited on May 16, 2003. The Grand Jury notes that 
each, influx of cash from the Parking Authority seems to occur at a time when the balance for the 
fund is nearing zero and a deposit is needed to prevent the fund from going into the red. Each 
payment from the Parking Authority decreases the amount the Parking Authority would 
otherwise be transferring to the City's General Fund for core municipal services and/or requires 
it to borrow more for parking improvements. 

In August of 2002, Mealy acknowledged a request by Reed to move $175,000.00 worth . 
of proceeds from bonds sold on behalf of the incinerator to make them available for the purchase 
of artifacts. Mealy candidly .assessed the difficulties in using the bond money for that purpose, 
and suggested to Reed in that letter that perhaps it would be possible to re-characterize money 
from bond proceeds as "fees" so that they could be used for another purpose. Mealy testified 
that, in retrospect, it was improper for the Authority to give Reed money in that manner by 
characterizing it as a fee when no services, that Mealy could recollect, were rendered. Mealy 
testified .that no one had more influence in the affairs of the Authority than Stephen Reed. 

During his testimony, Mealy was shown a document that was included in the closing 
documents for a March 2003 swap in which the school district participated. The swap involved 
an underlying $80 million borrowing (1 999 Bonds) that utilized the City of York General 
Authority as the conduit issuer on behalf of the Harrisburg School District. • Not wanting to be 
left out of an opportunity to reap the benefits of a swap, Reed negotiated that the Harrisburg 
Authority would receive a $239,000.00 fee, paid by JP Morgan, for "research and 



16 



development" 5 . Mealy could not say what "research and development" a municipal Authority 
would have undertaken on behalf of a school district and an investment bank to justify such a 
fee. He testified the Authority did a small amount of research into the wastewater treatment ' 
plant and a unique treatment process that was being used but indicated that it would not have 
been appropriate to take money out of the bonds floated to benefit the school district to pay the 
Authority for that research. 

Trent .Hargrove testified before this Grand Jury. Hargrove served on the board of .the 
Authority and as its chairman from 1991 to 2004. Hargrove also served, at various times, on the 
Harrisburg School Board of Control to which he was appointed by. Reed, the Board of the 
Harrisburg Civic Baseball Club to which he was appointed by Reed, and as chairman of the 
Board of Control for the Harrisburg University of Science and Technology to which he was 
appointed by Reed. Indeed, Hargrove served on the Authority Board at the same time as he was 
Chairman of the Board of Control for the Harrisburg University of Science and Technology 
during the period the Authority was involved in the issuance of debt on behalf of the University. 

With respect to the $77 million dollar school district debt transaction, from which the 
Authority claimed a $515,000 dollar fee, Hargrove had no personal knowledge-of what work 
would have been done by the Authority to justify that fee. He concurred that the Authority did 
not determine the amount of the fee they simply approved it at the time of the closing_of a given 
transaction. Of Reeds influence over the Authority, Hargrove testified "obviously, everybody 

5 The $239,000 fee that Reed created was paid to THA on March 19, 2003 
and coincidentally filled the deficit that existed in the special projects 
fund. According to the City Special Project Fund OuickReport, on the date of 
the deposit of the $239,000.00, the fund was operating in the red to the tune ■ 
of $224,216.28. The influx of money filled the void and allowed the fund to 
be in the black by $14 , 783 . 72 . ' ' 

17 



would know the truexealitv of process that was that no major decisions were made, no major 
bonds were- issued, no financial transactions occurred, nobody was appointed as a contractor, 
advisor, or counsel without [Reed's] expressed or tacit approval. If Reed did not want it to 
happen, it would have not happened." 

Frederick Clark testified before this Grand Jury. He was appointed by Reed to the board 
of the Harrisburg Authority from 2002-2007. He ' also served on the board of the Harrisburg 
Redevelopment Authority and the Parking Authority. Both positions were bestowed upon him 
by Reed. He sat on the Board of Control for the Harrisburg School District .as well. He testified 
that Reed selected every professional that was involved with every financial. transaction that 
occurred in the city and that their fees were always paid out of the proceeds from the bonds. 

Mr. Clark discussed the Special Projects Fund and indicated that there were often- times 
when the fund had no money remaining in its coffers and the board would htave to approve 
movement of money from other Authority accounts into the special projects account. The other 
way that the board would balance the .budget of the special projects fund was through the 
administrative fees that came out of most of the financial transactions. He testified that the 
administrative fee was~something wholly created by Reed. It had no' basis in work that was done 
by the Authority and the board had no .voice in determining what the fee would be. 

David Brinjac, of Brinjac Engineering, testified before this Grand Jury. Brinjac had 
performed work on the incinerator from 1982 to 1988 or 89. Brinjac installed the initial turbine 
engine in that facility. When talk began in the mid '90's of the need to retrofit the incinerator, 
Brinjac, in association with Chester Engineers and Malcom Pirnie, responded to a 1995 request 
for proposal concerning the feasibility of bringing the incinerator into compliance. Brinjac 



.18 



concluded such an effort was not financially viable for either the City or the Authority because of 
the amount of debt already outstanding and the additional amount it would be necessary to incur. 

In August of 1995, Brinjac presented his conclusions to Reed and his executive staff: 
The engineers informed Reed that if it was easy to do this, kind of waste to energy facility 
project, they would be "building incinerators everywhere" and that it was much harder with the 
$68 million or $70 million dollars already outstanding. in debt. Reed said "[fjhank you. You are 
fired." Reed walked out of the room. 

Ultimately, the decision was made to hire Barlow, an unknown entity in the City of 
Harrisburg, to perform the retrofit. The problems with that company and the project itself are 
widely known and certainly served to send Harrisburg deeper into financial ruin. 

II. HARRISBURG SCHOOL DISTRICT 

William Gxetton, EI, testified before this Grand Jury.. Gretton served as business 
administrator of the school district from December of 200 1 to March of 2008. In that capacity, 
he oversaw all non-educational functions of the school district to include facilities, ' 
transportation, food service, information technology, and others. He reported to the 
superintendent who in turn reported to the Harrisburg School Board of Control. When Gretton 
began bis work, the school district was undertaking a process of maj or renovations to its facilities 
around the district. The money to make those improvements was raised by issuing municipal 
bonds. Gretton testified that he was aware that the school district paid a fee to the Harrisburg 
Authority. Gretton testified he was under the impression that school districts couldn't issue then- 
own debt and had to pay the Authority a fee for the use of their "service" in issuing the debt on 
the district's behalf. This is not actually the case and the School District had issued directly 

19 



before and after his tenure. When shown the 2003 closing statement which records the 
$515,000.00 paid to the Authority by the school district, Gretton theorized thatthe amount of the 
fee was based on the size of the underlying transaction, but testified he would not be surprised to 
learn that rn this instance. Reed had set the amount of that fee. He "understood at the time 
[Reed] directed that certain bond counsel be utilized and that certain legaLfirms be involved. So 
certainly that would not surprise [him] that that amount was established hi that manner.". 
Gretton testified that he was sometimes surprised by the amount of the fee that the school district 
was obliged to pay but that he wouldn't see it until after the bonds had been issued and the fees 
set and then he just had to accept it. It wasn't his. job, he felt, to question it. 

Gretton farther testified that the school district entered into bond "swap" transactions 
which- are complex, and in this instance, expensive, financial products meant to manage interest 
rate risk. The swap transactions- also generated fees which were paid from the proceeds of 
school district bonds to professionals whom Reed selected. 

Gretton testified that be was.unaware that money from the "adrninistrative fee" charged 
by the Harrisburg Authority to the school district went to the. purchase of Wild Western and other 
artifacts and memorabilia. He did recall, however, that he received .a telephone call from a 
reporter inquiring about that misuse of school district money for that purpose and that he referred 
the matter to then superintendent Dr. Gerald Kohn. 

Gretton testified he was concerned about the district's spending at Reed's direction. He 
recalled an instance where Reed directed the district to hire the African American Chamber of 
Commerce for rninority and women's business enterprise compliance services. The chamber had 
no customers, and so had to be paid in advance by the school district just to begin the work for 



20 



which they had been engaged. Gretton indicated that the work that the Chamber was doing for 
the school district rapidly fell off to a level that was not worth the money that \vas paid to them. 
Gretton recalled too that the district spent more on Lobbying and legal fees than any other district 
for which he worked. Gretton testified that they had their own in house solicitor, their own 
construction firm, and a- firm that dealt with special education services. Gretton testified the 
district paid $1.1 million dollars in lobbying -costs alone to an area lobbying group which 
routinely received contracts from Reed. This money was budgeted under "legal fees" although 
the services provided by this lobbying group were self-evidently non-legal in nature. 

Of Reeds control of the enterprise that is the Harrisburg School District, Gretton testified 
"if you look at the history of the [school] board of control . . . there were certain times when 
somebody from the Board of Control didn't agree with one of [Reed's] decisions and that person 
was.quickly replaced. . . . "[T]he control was coming from above, [Reed's] level." Indeed, Reed 
threatened to fire Gretton himself when "I made a decision that conflicted with something [Reed] 
thought should happen. .. ." 

Dr. Gerald Kohn, Superintendent of the Harrisburg School District from 200 1 to 20 1 G, 
testified before this Grand Jury. Dr. Kohn indicated that he had recently left a New Jersey 
School District and applied for and was selected to be superintendent of the Harrisburg School 
District. During that time, Kohn testified, Reed was able to appoint, and remove, members of 
the school board pursuant to the Education Empowerment Act. 6 Dr. Kohn recalled that he 
would meet with Reed and Reed would tell him that the district had to issue bonds for a certain 

6 This Grand Jury has considered and rejected the defense that, the Education 
Empowerment Act authorized Reed so completely to usurp the basic 
responsibilities of the board members he appointed and so totally to direct 
the 'business , of the school district that he picked every vendor and 
professional and ultimately used school district money to buy collectibles 
and memorabilia for himself. 

■ 21 



project. Reed would instruct binras to the recommendation that would need to be made to the 
board of control and Kohn would thereafter make that vote an agenda item, for the next board 
meeting. 

Kohn recalled he was in attendance at several meetings concerning the issuance of school 
district bonds where Reed ordained to everyone in the room who would be appointed bond 
counsel, financial advisor, and so on and what the particular terms of that bond issue would be. 

Dr. Kohn told this Grand Jury that he was not aware that bond money was being paid to 
the Harrisburg Authority in the form of an administrative fee. He testified that he was "greatly 
surprised" that the district had paid more than half a million dollars to the Authority as a 
transaction fee for the 2003 bond issue. He testified thathe did not know Reed was using that 
money to buy antiquities and collectibles. Incredibly, the post-it-note on which Bill Gretton had 
written to Kohn regarding the reporter's inquiries about artifact purchases survived and is an 
exhibit before this Grand Jury. When confronted, with that note, Kohn had testified he.did not 
remember having seen it or its contents. 

Kohn corroborated Gretton' s testimony that it was Reed who recommended the "swap" 
transactions to the 'school district and in fact told him to put swap approval on the agenda for the • 
board of control. Kohn was unequivocal that Reed dictated the terms of debt transactions both to 
the school district and the professionals whom he would appoint. He testified that Reed would 
send his advisors to the board of control meetings to make a PowerPoint presentation and they 
were "quite convincing 'that it was in the school district's best interest to do this or not do it." He 
indicated that if Reed recommended a specific financial transaction, which they could be certain 
he had or it wouldn't have made its way onto their agenda, "then the board would vote for it." 



22 



To illustrate that-pointy Kohn recalled an instance upon which he and other members of 
the board of control met in public session. A gentleman in- the audience, who had just been 
appointed by Reed" as the first president of the Harrisburg University of Science and Technology, 
stood up to thank the board for its $3 .25 -million gift to the University. No one on the stage had 
any. idea what he was talking about. They didn't know, Reed had not consulted them, and had 
negotiated, pledged, and delivered this money from the school district without the slightest 
involvement of anyone responsible for its governance. Kohn testified "I can't tell you how 
surprised I was as was everyone else. There was outrage. Literally you could hear the jaws 
hitting the table as we heard this. . ." Kohn was apparently only one of two people on the school 
board that had Reed's direct phone number. He called and demanded a meeting. "When Reed 
eventually gave them an-audience, "the five members of the board of control-and I were there 
and they were furious not to have known and the mayor got angry and said, stop, listen to this: 
and he explained that the $3.25 million -dollars was the beginning of a down payment on a 
building that was going to be built for the school district for Sci Tech High School for $20 
million dollars of which the mayor-had obtained $4 plus million dollar private contributions from 
a number of business people in the community.'' Reed went on to explain, Kohn testified, that 
Reed had actually pledged $20 million dollars of school district money for this Sci Tech High to 
be paid in installments over a number of years. Again, this Grand Jury emphasizes that this 
massive encumbrance of the schools of Harrisburg was accomplished by fiat and continues to 
haunt the financially strapped school district to this day. 

Dr. Kohn testified that he "was hurt that I didn't know about [Reed's $20 million dollar 
pledge on behalf of the school district] at first; but when you work with Mayor Reed that 
happens a lot." 

23 



The Grand Jury was able to review a letter dated August 5, 2004 from James Lo sty, the 
managing director at RBC Dain Rauscher to Tieed wherein Losty indicated that Act 72 was 
adopted in Pennsylvania and was to go into effect as of September 3, 2004. The Act was -going 
to require school districts to go to referendum for approval of municipal bond offerings. Losty 
indicated that he had been in talks with Public Financial Management and Bill Gretton regarding 
. the possibility of negating this requirement by entering into a bond purchase agreement at that 
time for future delivery of bonds. Losty wrote that such a transaction wouldn't require any up- 
front fees but would allow for "future flexibility with regard to the timing of the actual delivery 
of bonds and the structure of bonds". He ended his letter by noting that the school district had 
roughly $25million of borrowing capacity remaining. This Grand Jury finds Reed 
enthusiastically agreed and encumbered the school district with the maximum possible debt and 
gave Losty the business in- return. Reed also set aside $5 million from the $25 million to be used 
for capital and operating costs at the Harrisburg University of Science and Technology, 
indicating that this was "a critical component of this bond transaction". Dr. Kohn testified he 
was not aware of this transaction until the day of his Grand Jury testimony. 

Lr October 2004, two Memoranda of Understanding were prepared between the 
Harrisburg School District and the Harrisburg University of Science and Technology. One of the 
MO.U provided for $5 million to be paid to the Harrisburg University of Science and Technology 
out of the proceeds of the $77 million borrowing from 2003. In exchange, Harrisburg University 
of Science and Technology agreed to grant district students access to the university. It is unclear 
what value that should have been to the School District as consideration considering the entire 
purpose of the project was to serve District students. The other MOU provided that the district 
would provide assistance to the university in the form of planning, staffing and construction of 



24 



the facilities, technical assistance related to the construction, academic support, fundraising and ' 
grant counseling and any other assistance agreed to by the parties. In exchange, the university 
was to make yearly payments of $290,000.00 to the school district for a period of tenyears 
beginning on November 1 , 2016 arid concluding on October 31, 2025 as payment for the services 
rendered. Dr. Kohn testified that he was not aware of this transaction either. Notwithstanding 
the memoranda's recording many transactions, Dr. Kohn maintained he was only aware of the 
$3.25 million dollars that was given to the University of Science and Technology and even then 
only after it was revealed to hirn by a spectator at an open session board meeting.' 

Kohn testified it was normal for him to be excluded from decision making regarding the 
finances of the school district which he was paid $235,43 1.00 7 annually to superintend. 

Dr. Kohn likewise testified he was unaware of any tennination of the swap agreements in 
to which the school district entered during his tenure or at what cost to the district such 
terminations were obtained. 

ill. HARRISBURG CIVIC BASEBALL CLUB 

This Grand Jury finds that by the time of the debt issuance necessary to renovate the 
Harrisburg Senators Stadium facility on City Island, Reed had found a model that worked. This 
Grand Jury further finds that Reed began to view any instance of municipal borrowing as an 
opportunity to create and divert resources for the acquisition of antiquities and collectibles. This 
Grand Jury is satisfied that by the time of the transactions described below, Reed was treating the 
resources of the Harrisburg Civic Baseball Club, the municipal entity which administered the 
city owned Harrisburg Senators baseball team, and disposing of them, as his own. 

Gregory Martini testified before this Grand Jury. Martini served as chairman of the 
board of directors of the Harrisburg Senators from 1996' to 2006. In 2004, during Martini's 

7 As of the end of his tenure. 

• 25 



tenure, the Harrisburg Redevelopment Authority issued $18 . million dollars' worth of bonds to 
pay for the renovation of the Harrisburg Senators' stadium facility on City Island The state was 
expected to provide grant money for this project as well, however the money was not 
immediately forthcoming. 

Of note for this particular borrowing is that the Harrisburg Authority did not participate 
in the financing in any way, but they still received a fee in the amount of $70:,0"00.00 that was 
deposited into the special projects fund. This fee was the subject of much debate within city 
■council, as they believed that such a fee' was in direct contravention of the ordinance that 
authorized the project, which directed that all revenue be- placed in the general fund. City 
Council demanded return of the $70,000.00 to the general fund. The Harrisburg Authority 
responded by having the solicitor, Bruce Foreman, write a letter to City Council President- 
Richard House wherein he stated that the ordinance- that was-passed provides for "payment of 
excess net revenues from the operation of the Stadium." He went on to indicate that the 
ordinance did not refer to receipt and deposit of fees, as they cannot be characterized as 
operating revenue or net operating revenue and therefore, the receipt by the Authority of the fee 
was entirely appropriate 

Around the same time, Reed began buying sports memorabilia and miagining some sort . 
of sports museum in the Harrisburg area. 

To legitimize that effort, Reed tapped his friend John Levenda to become the only 
employee of a national sports hall of fame foundation. The question now became how to pay 
Mr. Levenda. Martini testified he recalled a letter sent to him by Reed in December of 2004 
asking the Harrisburg Civic Baseball Club to pay $125,000.00 to the National Sports Hall of 
Fame. Martini testified he took his direction from Reed and was prepared to cut the check based 



26 



solely on the letter; no farther documentation, as to its.necessity or proposed use was supplied or 
requested. The fantastically tenuous reason advanced for why the Harrisburg Civic Baseball 
Club should want to simply give $125,000.00 to.a museum which did not exist and to the one 
person foundation marketing it came from Reed. The museum, if it was ever built, Reed 
explained, could be built on City Island. The Senators also play on City Island. So it -followed, 
,to Reed' s mind, that when the non-existent museum appeared it is possible that some of its 
patrons might- also visit the Senators and that provided sufficient justification for the Harrisburg . 
Civic Baseball Club to simply pour money onto John Levenda. This Grand Jury is troubled that 
Reed went so far as to suggest to Martini that the HCBC could book this payment as a legitimate 
expense under the 2004 bond agreement based on nothing more than his bald assertion that if 
such a museum was ever built some of its customers might go to a Senators game. 

That transaction.between R'eed and Martini was not consummated in 2004. On January 
26, 2005, Reed wrote Martini again, this time requesting apayment of $100,000.00 for John 
Levenda. Martini made this payment from Senators' bond proceeds based on nothing more than 
Reed's letter. Martini testified that Levenda never submitted any documentation to account for 
the expenditure and none was requested. Martini testified that the National Sports Hall- of Fame 
never existed in any form more substantial than proposals, never broke ground, and Martini was 
not sure if city council voted on the proj ect or even if they were aware of it. 

a. Midwinter baseball meetings 

This Grand Jury heard testimony that Reed would travel to the ""Mid- Winter Meetings" 
held by Major League Baseball in various locations and throughout the country and which, also 
included events for minor league teams. Reed attended these meetings at the expense of the 
Harrisburg Civic Baseball Club. Martini testified he would write checks directly from the 



27 



HCBC account to Reed. Sometimes Reed would submit receipts, and sometimes 'he-would 
simply ask for an amount without supplying any documentation at all. Again, he provided no 



amount to be paid to him and indicate that he had receipts if anybody wanted to look at them. 

Reed was unable to confine the activities of these junkets even to their nominal purpose 
and frequently seized the opportunity to go artifact shopping. Even though these shopping trips 
were in no way related to any legitimate business of the Harrisburg Civic Baseball-Club, Reed 
would ask for and receive reimbursement from the HCBC anyway. 

Martini testified that he was aware that John Levenda and Richard Pickles, then a 
member of the Harrisburg Police Department, would sometimes accompany Reed on these 
shopping trips. The findings of this. Grand Jury with respect to those _shopping_trips are set out 
more completely below. 



documentation and no one asked him for any.. For travel, Reed would simply ask for a given 



b. Storage of property in Martini's b 



asement 



Those checks are as follows: 

1. July 9,- 2007 

2. August 9, 2007 

3. August 20, 2007 

4. September 20, 2007 

5. June 18, • 2008 

6. July 21, 2008 

7. August 5, 2008 

8. August 18, 2008 

9. September 2, 2008 

10. September 24, 2008 

11. November 3, 2008 

12. December 5, 2008 
13.. December 22, 2008 



$ 5,000.00* 

$ 9,443.46* 

$ 3,633.76* 

$ 1,659.12* 

$ 10,000.00 

$ 4,821.00 

$ 6,900.00 

$ 2, 600.00- 

$ 2,617.17 

$ 3, 750.00' 

$ 3,671.63 

$ 1,000.00 

$ 4,722.11. 



Total $ 5,9, 818.25 



*Prior to sale of team 



28 



Martini testified, that Reed called him in- December of 2009 shortly before be left office, 
-asking if he could store some "Things in his building. Martini acquiesced arrd did not press Reed 
about the reason that he needed the storage or what in particular' he would be storing. Martini. • 
testified that Reed and other city employees showed up to his .office with 15 different sized 
cartons for storage which they put into the storage area in the basement of his building. The 
items remained in his possession until they were turned over to the Office of Attorney General in 
201 4. Martini testified. that, upon advice from counsel and in answer to a Grand Jury subpoena, 
he opened the storage containers that were not wooden shipping crates and created an itemized 
list of the artifacts .that were contained within them. One of the storage containers had a- packing 
slip attached to the outside which matched one of the checks from Harrisburg Civic Baseball 
Club. . Other items that were within the-collection in Martini's basement are: 

Box 1 : 

Unopened carton from Silvertip in Glorieta, NM 
. Box 2: • " 

.Unopened carton from Silvertip in Glorieta, NM 
Box 3:' 

1 0 plastic pennant holders 
. Hall of Fame 2006 bat 
Autographed Adirondack bat for NY Yankees 

2 other unopened bats • . • 

2 bat holders' 

1893 baseball print— Univ. of PA 
Hbg. Colored Elks ticket 
1920's catcher's chest protector 
Catcher's glove 

' Box .4: 

Box of Topps Anniversary collection 1 952-1 990 baseball cards 
Senators' shirt 

Framed cards of Robin Roberts, Ritchie Ashburn, Don Drysdale & Hank Aaron 

Yankees flag ■ 

Yankees 100 card legacy set 

Autographed Orlando Cepeda baseball 

Autographed Ron Guidry baseball 

Autographed Mickie Riveria baseball 

6 baseball books 

29 



Braves shirt for Assenmacher 

5 Harrisburg Senators 2008 programs 

Yankee stadium memorabilia 

13 various framed cards. 

5 6- baseball card sets 

Topps baseball card set for 2008 

Wheaties box. 

Box 5: 

Unopened box from Great American Illustrators — detailed packing list included 

Box 6: 

47 signed posters 

Box 7: 

Unopened carton from Silvertip in Glorieta, NM 

Box 8: 

2 Babe Ruth photos . 

1 Jackie Robinson photo 

Box 9: 

Batting Rug poster 
US Marines poster 
1 920. Negro League poster 
Box 10: 

5Q Major League baseba-11 card packs 

1 shot glass 
Box 11: 

1 Western lamp 
Box 1-2: 

1 Western bar stool 
Box 13: 

Negro League leather j acket 

Hbg'. Cougars 2002 state champion hat and shirts 

Major League duffel bag 

3 baseball gloves 

2 Negro League baseballs signed on July 12, 2008 at Broad St. Market 
NY Yankees and Negro League hats 

Phillies towel 

Box of baseball magazines and papers 
Catcher's mask ' 
Ball holders 
Yankees jacket 

Hbg. High license plate holder 
Baseball encyclopedia 
Box 14: 

8 ball holders 

4 catcher's masks 

Jason Giambi bobble head 



30 



3 packs baseball centennial cards from Cooperstown 
•Yankees shirt 

4 baseball gloves 

1978 Topps baseball card set . 
Glove & 4 baseballs 

6 2008 Hall of Fame programs 
Mickie Mantel book 

4 Yankees magazines- 
Yankees coffee mug 
Baltimore Orioles pennant 
Cal Ripkin shirt 

Shea Stadium shirt 

2 Negro League hats 

Pennants for Baltimore Orioles, Chicago Black Hawks, Chicago Bears, Chicago White 
Sox & Brooklyn Dodgers 

7 autographed baseballs 

8 Upstate Life magazines 

7 Gatemen programs for 2008 

5 Memories & Dreams magazines 
Box 15: 

3 unwrapped photos 
Goose Gossage framed photo- 
Negro League framed photo 
Yankee Stadium collector's patches 
Final season Yankee Stadium photo 

1 942 Whitehouse correspondence to Judge Landis 
Shea Stadium final season framed picture 

Certificates of authenticity signed by Mayor Reed regarding Negro.League purchases 
Jackie Robinson bobble head 
Maris & Mantle bobble heads 
3 Yankees hats 

Shea- Stadium hat ' 
2- Negro League hats 

Correspondence from Tom Snyder to Mayor Reed 
Wrapped baseball 

Mickie Mantel and Ted Williams photos 

Baseball from July 3, 2008 at Commerce Bank Park 

Hbg. Giants baseball shirt 

3 baseball pins 
Baseball mug 

2 Cooperstown souvenir bats 

4 posters signed by Jose Cansaco & Jack Clark 
Other baseball posters 



31 



Some of these items were purchased from a vendor called "Silvertip". Documentation 
provided by the City of Harrisburg and presented to this Grand Jury establishes that this 
"Silvertip lot" of items was purchased with city monev and considered missing at the time of the 
inventory of city owned memorabilia and the subsequent auction of Wild West items. This 
Grand Jury finds that those Silvertip items belonged to the City of Harrisburg and their rendition, 
by Reed to Martini's basement deprived the city and its creditors of their value. 

Special Agent Craig LeCadre testified that during an interview with Reed, he specifically 
asked him about the items that were stored in Martini's basement. Reed's response was that he 
had' no idea why there would be any artifacts stored in Martini's basement. LeCadre testified 
that Reed asked him if a. mirror was among the items recovered from Martini's basement because 
there were plans to put a restaurant called the "Bullpen Cafe" in the vicinity of the visiting- 
team's dug-out in the renovation project of the Harrisburg Senator's ball park. Agent LeCadre 
testified that he showed Reed pictures of the items that had been retrieved from Martini's 
basement on his cell phone. Upon viewing the photographs, Reed acknowledged that he 
recognized the mirror and horns but did not recollect the matching table lamps-. He went on to 
acknowledge that the container shipped to "Harrisburg Civic Baseball Ass., c/o Office of the 
Mayor". 

IV. THE NATIONAL SPORTS HALL OF FAME 

John Le'venda testified before this Grand Jury. Levenda testified that he served as the 
President of AA Minor League Baseball's Eastern League from 1993 to 1996. The Eastern 
Leagues offices moved to Harrisburg because Reed agreed to build a space for them there and to 
charge them the same amount of rent as their old facility m Plainville, Connecticut. In that role, 



32 



Levenda oversaw umpires and score ke.ep.ers and insured that each, team was paying its annual 
.dues. He attended ballgames and baseball meetings and looked after league .expenses. After his 
move to Harrisburg, the owners of the Eastern League did not re-elect rrimin 1996 and he was 
looking for work. He suggested to- Reed that he be hired to furidraise for the burgeoning 
National Civil War Museum and the nascent Sports Hall of Fame. Reed hired him as a 
consultant to raise money for both projects. This contract did not need City Council's approval 
because it was considered "a personal service- contract." Levenda testified that Reed didn't 
advertise or look, for other candidates and that this position was created for him at his suggestion. 
Levenda recalled he was hired in November of 1996 at a salary of $45,000.00 or $50,000.00 a 
year including health insurance. Levenda testified he began to. try and solicit donors and 
sponsors for the Civil War Museum and the Sports Hall of Fame. Levenda testified that he 
discovered the Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame- an organization which already existed, had 
received $9.5 million dollars in RACP 9 grant money. Levenda testified that Reed attempted to- 
persuade the PA Sports Hall of Fame to hire an executive director and raise matching funds so 
that the state grant could be accessed and spent. 

The PA Sports Hall of Fame in turn asked Reed to ban them the matching money. Reed 
tentatively agreed but the deal was never consummated. Levenda testified he did not believe 
Reed discussed the possibility- of this $7 -million dollar bridge loan with city council nor did he 
seek city council's approval. Levenda himself did not question Reed about this because, he 
testified, he just wanted to advance the project 



9 The Redevelopment -Assistance Capital Program (RACP) is a commonwealth grant 
program "for the acquisition . and construction of regional economic, cultural, 
civic, recreational, and historical improvement projects." 

33 



Levenda testified, that at some point-it became clear that the PA Sports Hall of Fame was 
not serious about the museum project and Reed decided that the city was going to take the 
project over exclusively and rename it the Pennsylvania National Sports Hall of Fame. In 2002, 
that name was changed again to the National Sports Hall of Fame, and was intended to feature 
athletes, coaches and administrators from youth sports through professional and Olympic level 
sports. 

Levenda testified .that the RAOP money was' still available from the State but the newly 
named National Sports Hall of Fame (NSHF) would still need to raise matching money. 

In 2005, Levenda testified that the City had been through a round of layoffs and Reed and 
Levenda decided that it "didn't look good" for the City to continue paying Levenda' s salary^as a 
consultant for the NSHF so they created a board for the NSHF. Levenda became the only 
employee of the National Sports Hall of Fame Foundation in 2005, carried the title President and 
Chief Executive Officer, and received an annual salary of $87,500.00, health benefits, a $600.00 
monthly car allowance and four (4) weeks of paid vacation. Again, Levenda testified, Pveed re- 
characterized his employment because it "didn't look good" to have him continue working for 
and receiving payment from the City during this time of increasing financial stress. 

Levenda testified that as the Foundation's lone employee he approached city council to 
solicit them to guarantee $10 million dollars' worth of loans for the Sports Hail of Fame 
Museum. City council refused, and Levenda testified his solicitation came at a time when the 
full extent of Reeds's municipal debt crisis was becoming visible. 



34 



By December of 2008, hope for the museum had been abandoned and, Levenda testified, 
any money left in the foundation coffers went to pay for his continuing health insurance in 
accordance with his employment -agreement. 

Indeed, even after the decision was taken not to pursue the.museum, the foundation 
continued to accept money. In January of 2009, two checks were written from HCBC to the 
National Sports. Hall of Fame Foundation for $75QD0 each. after the project was ostensibly 
abandoned. John Levenda testified that "every dollar that we could~still raise, number one,- 
helped with my health insurance." This Grand Jury finds the administration of the HGBC was 
consistent with the pattern of the institutionalization of conflict apparent in every other municipal 
enterprise which Reed controlled. Levenda himself was placed on the Board of the Harrisburg 
Civic Baseball .Club by Reed'in 2003 and remained on the Board during the period he solicited 
HCB C for money, sometimes for no purpose other than to pay himself. 

Levenda testified extensively about bis travel with Reed and other associates to "Mid- 
Winter Baseball meetings," which would often migrate into artifact shopping trips and pure 
vacations. 

Xevenda recalled he attended such meetings with" Harrisburg Police officer Rick Pickles, 
.Reed, Martini, and sometimes the general manager in at least the years 2004 through 2008. 

Levenda testified that the 2004 meeting was held in Anaheim, California. He traveled 
with Reed to Anaheim four (4) days prior to the meeting, and testified that he and Reed flew to 
San Francisco, spent the day there, drove into Nevada for a day, drove back through San Jose 
and spent the night there. They then drove to Los Angeles or San Luis Obispo before traveling to 
Anaheim for the meeting. Levenda testified that this trip had nothing to do with baseball and 

35 



Reed wanted to "see the sights." He and Reed submitted all their receipts for reimbursement to 
the HCBC for payment. 

Levenda also attended the 2005 meeting which was held in Dallas. He scheduled a 
meeting for Reed with a sports memorabilia collector in Boca Raton, Florida for three days after 
the baseball meetings ended. Rather .than flying- bade to Harrisburg and back down for the 
shopping trip, Levenda and Reed went directly to Florida. They "killed time" before their 
meeting by visiting Key West. This trip was paid for by HCBC and, Levenda testified, had 
nothing to do with Senators' baseball. Levenda testified that at the time he didn't ask questions 
about the propriety of these trips but now,- in retrospect, recognizes that they were wrong. 

Levenda testified that no one questioned Reed about these trips and that Levenda did not 
believe that anyHCBC board members saw the receipts-from the trips, rather, they were 
submitted directly to the general manager who simply wrote a check. 

In addition to accompanying the Mayor on artifact shopping trips, Levenda and Rick 
Pickles, who was a member of the Harrisburg Police Department at the time, would travel twice 
a year to locations designated by Reed to pick up artifacts which Reed had purchased and haul 
them back to Harrisburg. Levenda testified that most of the artifacts they collected appeared to 
be Wild Western era pieces but there might have been some civil war artifacts as well. Levenda 
testified they were not, however, picking up baseball or sports related memorabilia. For these 
trips Levenda collected his regular salary and did not take vacation time. Richard Pickles was 
also paid his salary as a. Harrisburg City Police Captain. Levenda testified he and Pickles would 
fly out to a destination designated by Reed then travel on to whatever particular vendor or site 
was holding the artifacts which Reed had purchased. They would then load those items into a 



36 



conventional U-Haul type rental truck and drive them back to Harrisburg. No special 
accommodation for the sensitivity of antiquities to the environment was made. No insurance or 
other indemnification was sought or purchased. Levenda testified that the truck could be 
carrying anywhere from $100,000.00 to $1 million dollars 5 worth of artifacts. This Grand Jury 
has learned that the rental truck would often be left sitting unattended in the parking lot of a 
motel as Levenda and Pickles made their way back across the country to the city with Reed's 
purchases. When they arrived, Levenda testified, they would deliver the load of artifacts to the 
"D and D building" located near the incinerator and unload the artifacts into a storage room 
there. 

On one such 2004 trip, Levenda submitted receipts to the Harrisburg Authority for 
reimbursement in the amount of $9,900.00, Even Thomas Mealy expressed concern about this 
reimbursement request because-it included alcohol, typically an item unavailable for 
reimbursement by the Authority. Levenda told Mealy that he was "driving a 25 foot truck 
through blizzards and tornados and at the end of the day if I want a drink I am going to have 
one." That reimbursement request was paid. 

Special Agent Lecadre testified that he. and "Special Agent Thomas Gote interviewed 
Stephen Reed on April 7, 2015. LeCadre- testified that during the course of the interview, Reed 
was asked about using John Levenda and Rick Pickles to transport artifacts. Reed indicated to 
the agents that the city "literally saved tens of thousands of dollars" by utilizing those gentlemen 
to do that work. Reed considered Pickles' actions as part of his duties as a city police officer to 
protect the artifacts during the shipping process. LeCadre testified that Reed did. not consider the. 
use of a city police officer to be inappropriate. Reed informed LeCadre that he allowed Pickles 
to be carried as "administrative leave with pay" while on these assignments. 

37 



Review of documentation from Pickles' personnel file indicate that there are three 
separate instances where -Pickles' time -sheet was changed from vacation time to "leave with pay" 
at the behest of Reed. 

The first incident occurred in 2004. In an August 17, 2004 memo from Reed to the 
director of Human Resources, Reed indicated that Captain Pickles was "dispatched by the City 
of Harrisburg for the purpose of renting a vehicle and retrieving items purchased by the City in 
other states and returning them safely to Harrisburg." Reed indicated that Pickles' leave for May 
10-14 and May 17 should be changed from "Vacation With Pay" to "Administrative Leave". 
•There is a follow-up email from Deborah Felker, Personnel Officer with the Bureau of Human 
resources to Pickles where shexonfrrms that "pursuant to Mayoral instructions", she converted 
those" vacation days to leave with pay. A revie-w of his leave history for the year also 
demonstrates thatthe modification~-was made. 

The second incident occurred in 2005. In an August 3, 2005 memo from Reed to the 
director of Human Resources, Reed indicated that Captain Pickles was a representative of the 
City of Harrisburg in a visit to the Eastern Professional Baseball League Ail-Star Game in 
Portland, ME fromJuly 8-17. Reed indicated that Pickles' leave history should be adjusted to 
administrative leave so that his personal leave and vacation time remain unaffected. A review of 
his leave history for 2005 does not show that he used vacation or personal time for these dates. 

The third incident occurred in 2006. In a February 12, 2007 memo from Reed to the 
director of Human Resources, Reed indicated that Pickles was on "detached assignment in 
connection with the Winter Meetings of Professional Baseball" from November 29, 2006 until 
December 13, 2006 and that his leave should be changed to administrative leave rather than 



38 



personal or vacation leave. There is a follow-up email from Deborah- Felker, Director of Human 
Resources to Pickles where she indicated that "per Mayoral directive" she converted all vacation 
usage to ad mi nistrative leave for the period of November 26 through December 13, 2006. 
Documentation from the Personnel system indicates that he was' on Leave With Pay status for all 
of these dates. 

Todd Vander Woude testified before this Grand Jury. Vander Woude was employed as 
the general manager for the Harrisburg Senators from 1992 until 2007. Vander Woude testified 
that the HCBC board had five (5) members and that Reed appointed them. Vander Woude 
corroborated Martini' s testimony that Reed would attend mid- winter baseball meetings at the 
civic baseball club's expense, and therefore the City's, and sometimes 'extend those trips to go 
artifact shopping. Vander Woude recalledin 2005, for example, Reed- went to Boca Raton to 
look at a collection of .sports- memorabilia. Vander Woude recalled this instance -particularly 
because Reed- had written requests for reimbursement for the trip in the amount of $ 1 0,550. 1 9. 
Vander Woude testified that he was concerned about this request as it was an unbudgeted item 
and he didn't feel the trip was related to Senators' baseball but rather to the as yet unbuilt Sports 
Hall of Fame. That.notwithstanding, Reed received his reimbursement. 

V ander Woude corroborated Martini's testimony that Reed would simply submit a 
request for reimbursement without any receipts or other documentation and HCBC would s imp ly 
cut him a check. When shown the Silvertip items recovered from Martini's basement which 
were purchased with HCBC money, and indeed were sent in crates marked HCBC to city hall, 
Vander Woude testified they had nothing to do with the Senators or even with a Sports Hall of 
Fame. He testified that he would not have authorized HCBC money for those items had he 
known that was what Reed was buying. More generally, Vander Woude testified unequivocally 

39 



that HCBC was not a partner with Reed in purchasing artifacts; it was not the business of the 
Harrisburg Civic .Baseball Club to provide seed money for the Sports Hall of Fame or to buy- 
.artifacts. Expenditures for artifacts were in-no way related to the business of the ball club. As 
with so many other witnesses, Vander Woude testified he simply did not question Reed. Reed 
asked for the money and he- got it. 

V. THE HARRISBURG CITY COUNCIL 

. Richard House was elected to the Harrisburg City- Council in 1989 and served for 16 
years. He was Council president for 1 1 of those years. Reed was the mayor throughout House's 
entire tenure on city council. Of Reed's relationship to the Council, House testified "there was a 
saying-the media always called hi m the mayor for life. You kno w, if you start reading media 
.clips long enough -you start believing them- yourself. That was my beginning interpretation of 
city politics and that's what I meant by saying he ruled with an iron thumb because he- never 
■believed in the philosophy that we could agree to disagree. It was always you vote with me or 
you are- the enemy." 

Mr. House testified before this Grand Jury and indicated that in 2001, there was a ■ ; 
position with the Department of the Auditor General that, he wanted. Mr. House asked Reed to 
help him to get that job. R.eed met with the Auditor General but then informed Mr. House that 
he couldn't help him get the job. Soon after, Reed asked House if he would like to be the 
director of community relations for the Harrisburg Senators, a position that did not exist 
previously. With respect to that job, House testified to the quid quo pro which existed, "[Reed] 
offered me that position because therefore he knew he could control me and he could get me to 



40 



get all the votes that he needed for all his projects. . ." Indeed, Mr. House was asked directly 
about the existence of a quid quo pro in the following exchange: 

Question: "Did you feel. . . that this job, for instance, was an example of a quid quo pro, 
in other words, that you understood you were being given that job in exchange for your vote or 
the discharge of your official duty? " 

Answer: That's how I felt, yes, sir." 

He went on to testify that when Reed gave hirn the job with the Senators, Reed was buying not 
just Mr. House's vote but also- the votes of those on city council that House could control. 

Randy King, testified before this Grand Jury. Mr. King served as press secretary and 
director of cornmunications for Reed from 1989 to 2007. In that role he handled all media 
requests, was the public information officer, wrote press releases, gave interviews, arranged 
press conferences and media events and served as the legislative liaison to city council- whose 
meetings he would attend. 

He confirmed that when Richard House lost his state job, he went to Mayor-Reed to find 
him another job and, when there was no job to- be had in state government, Reed gave him a job 
as a community relations coordinator with the Harrisburg Senators. 

House testified that city council often had to deal with issues surrounding the incinerator. 
The city often had to use general fund money to support the operation of the facility. Mr. House 
recalled that the city got so far in debt because of the need to support the incinerator that there 
came a time when there was not enough money in the coffers to cover payroll and the city had to 
go out and secure bridge loans from the bank. In the worst times, city council was approving a 



41 



bridge loan every four months just to cover ail the debt that the incinerator-was creating. This 
financial crisis was hidden from the citizens and was the- backdrop to the decision to retrofit the 
incinerator and to float more than $ 1 00 million in bonds in 2003". 

. The decision to go forward with the retrofit ofthe incinerator was not one that was made 
lightly by the City Council. There were four public meetings that were held, at which the 
general project was discussed. In addition to the public meetings that were occurring, there were 
also many closed door, private meetings taking place as well. Richard House met with Mayor 
Reed on several occasions to discuss the incinerator and at each of these meetings, it was made 
clear to Mr. House just how important it was to get a yes vote for the incinerator bonds. Mr. 
House testified that at the outset, the votes to move forward with the project were not there. 
House conveyed this information to Mayor Reed at one of their meetings. Reed's response to 
learning that there were not enough-votes-was to ask Mr. House what he had to do for him 
personally in exchange for Mr. House getting the requisite number of yes votes for the 
incinerator bonds. Mr. House testified that he found Reed to be so direct in his proposed bribe 
that House anxiously, and silently, wrote out and held up a note asking Reed whether he. was 
recording the conversation. Reed responded by writing down that he was not recording the 
conversation and then asked if Mr. House was recording it. 

After this bizarre meeting between the two public figures, Mr. House went back to City 
Council and spoke with other members to find a way to make the incinerator bond vote more 
palatable. They devised a plan to create a city council special projects fund where the money 
held in the account would be divided amongst the council members and they could use it to 
donate to their" own pet projects. A city council woman suggested .that House ask Reed for $ 1 
million and indicated that- was the amount of money it would take for her to vote yes for the bond ' 

42 



deal. Mr. House testified that he felt that was too large a sum of money and decided to ask Reed 
for $700,000.00. He had another meeting with Mayor Reed where he pitched the special projects 
fund idea and the $700,000.00 figure. Mr. House testified that Reed~was angered by the request, 
but when told that the fund was what it was going to take to get the yes votes from city council, 
he acquiesced .and agreed to $500,000.00. Ultimately, due to budget constraints, the special 
projects fund only received $200,000.00 which was divided between all 7 city council members, 
with Mr. House receiving a slightly larger portion as the city council- president. The money from 
the fund was then donated to various organizations like The Boys and Girls Club of America, 
Salvation Army, Goodwill Industries and other community-based organizations in the city of 
Harrisburg. Mr. House testified that, although the donations were charitable in nature, each city 
council member derived a political benefit from each donation that was made. 

Randy King testified that the city council wanted'a WAM fund (Walking Around Money)- 
in exchange for pushing, forward the vote on the incinerator bonds. He indicated that the WAM 
funds were desirable to city council because "they wanted to throw money around to community 
groups so they could gather political support" as they were gearing up for re-election. 

King was asked directly about the quid pro quo of the WAM or 'councilmanic' fund in 
exchange for votes : 

Question: "[UJltimately you had to sort of agree to confer the fund just to get • 

them to vote for the — 

A. That is correct. 

Question: They held their vote hostage to a benefit at least in the context of that '03 deal? 



43 



A,: That's correct. 

VT. HAKRISBURG UMVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 



Dwayne Maua testified before this Grand Jury. Mr. Maun is employed as the Chief 
Financial Officer for the Harrisburg University of Science and Technology. In that role, he is 
responsible for all the regularly kept business records of the University's assets. Mr. Maun 
testified that Reed is a board member on the University and has served in that capacity since 
2002. 

Mr. Maun testified that in 20 1 0 the president of the University was Mel Schiavelli. Maun 
testified that Schiavelli and Reed were "very close friends." Maun testified that the proposal was 
madeby Schiavelli that, when it was clear Reed would not be returning to the mayor's office, 
that""[w]e're going to find .something for Mayor Reed to do. This will help him get on his feet." 

A contract was drafted between the University and Reed under which Reed would be 
paid .as- a regular guest lecturer in the "political mind" or "civic mind" courses. ■ Under the 
contract, Reed was also to work with University faculty to develop an elective three credit course, 
in Entrepreneurship in Government which was to be offered in the spring of 201 1 . Additionally, 
Reed would serve on the University advisory board for its entrepreneurship program. Reed 
would also participate in a panel discussion to be scheduled in the fall of 2010 on topics related 
to the future of government. Reed would additionally participate in student recruiting activities 
as appropriate. - 



44 



For these services Reed was to be paid a monthly stipend of $2,000.00 notto exceed a 
contract total of $ 12,000.00. Maun testified that, the terms of the contract notwithstanding, the 
only services Reed ever provided were to appear as a guest lecturer several times. Maun testified 
that he felt the University did not get its money's worth out of this contract but thai it was paid 
in full to Reed. This Grand Jury saw the 1 099 form issued by the University for 2010 which 
demonstrates that he received the full $12,000.00. 

Another, similar, contract was created for 201 1. Maun testified Reed knew the 
University was about to come into $10 million dollars in loan proceeds. Maun testified that the 
relationship between Schiavelli and Reed was "pretty secret." The two held closed' door off site 
meetings. Maun testified that this new contract for 201 1 was limited to six (6) months and that 
limitation was intended to communicate to Schiavelli the distaste by the University's 
administrators for paying Reed for another year. 

Maun testified-, with respect to the 201 1 contract, Reed didn't perform any of the services 
for which the University contracted. The class for which Reed was supposed to lecture did not 
even exist in the University's curriculum. The only "recruiting" effort Reed made was to go. to 
Harrisburg High School and. tell the students that they could come to the University of Science 
and Technology for free. Maun expressed ambivalence as to whether that was a "recruiting" 
activity for which Reed should have been paid. The entrepreneurship program Reed was 
supposed to develop hadn't been established. That notwithstanding, another contract between 
Reed and the University for the remaining six (6) months of 20 1 1 was drafted. Maun testified 
that this occurred during a period when the University was in financial distress. In fact, the 
University missed its debt service payments in 2012 and the County has been paying $1 .5 
miUion per year for the past several years due to lack of sufficient funds to pay operations and 

45 



debt service on the bonds. Again, Maun testified that the contract grew out of the personal 
relationship between Reed and Schiavelli. Again, Reed received a $1,00.0.00 a month for each of 
the six months and again, Maun testified, Reed performed none of the services for which he was . 
being paid. This Grand Jury has seen the 1099 form issued by the University to Stephen Reed 
for 2011, which confirms that he was paid $6,000.00: Maun testified that during that time the 
University was illiquid and did not, and could not pay all of its vendors, which is why Reed did 
notreceive the entire $12,000 in2011. 

Reed considered that he was owed additional money. Maun testified that in 2012 the 
board of the University held a fund raising challenge. The idea was .that individual board 
members would pledge ox solicit a certain amount of money which would be matched by other 
board members. Maun testified that Reed participated in this challenge by offering to "forgive" 
the money that he was 'owed' under the 201 1 contract. Reed proposed, that he should then be 
credited with having "contributed" that amount to the capital campaign. 

Maun testified no contract was drafted between the University and Reed in 2012. . 
Schiavelli was looking for new employment himself and, Maun testified, was no longer focused 
on "feeding a friend." Maun testified he was not aware that Reed created any work product 
under any of these contracts. No syllabi, time cards, class materials or any other tangible product 
which the University might use for the benefit of its students. Maun additionally testified that 
usually guest lecturers are not compensated. By way of comparison, Maun testified, a typical 
contract for an adjunct professor would be $3,000.00 per semester. In other words, such an 
adjunct would teach for fifteen (15) weeks' and receive $3,000.00. Reeds' contract paid him four 
(4) times what the normal adjunct professor would receive and he did nothing to earn it. 



46 



VH. ARTIFACTS 

This-Grand Jury has heard testimony from numerous witnesses on the subject of Stephen 
Reed's compulsionto purchase antiquities, collectibles;, and other memorabilia. This Grand Jury 
finds that Reed demonstrated an almost pathological .preoccupation with the act of buying such 
artifacts. It has been the uniform testimony of witnesses before this Grand Jury, and the 
irrefutable proof of the evidence presented, that Reed: little cared for the ultimate disposition of 
the artifacts he purchased on behalf of the city. Indeed, this Grand Jury finds, that as a result of 
his indifference to the storage and maintenance of objects he purchased, those objects were 
exposed to a substantial risk of diminution in value or outright loss. 

In addition, as is set out in detail below, this Grand Jury finds that Stephen Reed 
improperly obtained possession, of hundreds of thousands, if not •millions, of dollars' worth of 
■artifacts purchased with the money of the people of the City of Hanisburg in violation of 
Pennsylvania's Criminal Code. 

Linda Lingle testified before this Grand Jury. Lingie worked for Reed from 1989 to " 
January of 2008. She began as the city's Director of Bureau of Operations and Revenue, twice 
served as acting director of Human Resources, and spent her last five (5) years with the city 
serving as Business Administrator. 

She testified that she knew John Levenda and Richard Pickles would accompany Reed on 
trips to shop for artifacts. 

She testified Reed would seek reimbursement for those trips and would submit receipts 
sometimes. The receipts that were submitted to her were for artifacts not for expenses associated 
with the shopping expeditions. 

47 



Ms. Lingle testified as to the process by which such reimbursements were processed. For 
example, in 1999, in excess of half a million dollars was disbursed from the city's general fund 
for the purchase of artifacts. Ms, Lingle noted that a secretary to the former special projects 
advisor handled that particular transaction. Evidence shown to Ms. Lingle and to this Grand Jury 
comprises the following: Ah invoice dated November 3, 199-8 billed to Stephen Reed, Mayor, 
from Purple Sage Antique Guns and Corrales, New Mexico. This itemized invoice lists the 
artifacts purchased including a badge, pistol, razor, and cane ostensibly belonging to-Wyatt Earp, 
and other items.- This Grand Jury notes that the items- which appear on the Purple Sage invoice 
appear to be Wild Western era artifacts. 

A city check requisition 'form was completed.' Ms. Lingle did not know why the special 
project advisor's secretary filled out the form. That form in turn was submitted to Robert- 
Kroboth, the city's former financial director, for review and approval. This Grand Jury notes ' 
that the description given on the check requisition form indicates "civil war archives" even 
though the items purchased are plainly described as belonging to the "Wild West" .era. This 
Grand Jury finds it misleading to characterize an item sold as Wyatt Earp's cane as an item 
appropriate for "Civil War" archives. 

That notwithstanding, a city check numbered 16090 for $540,000.00 and dated August 
10, 1999, was produced. This Grand Jury notes that the memo line indicates "Civil War M." 
Ms. Lingle observed that it appeared as though the description of the items had transformed from 
Wild Western nature on the invoice to Civil War archive on the check requisition to Civil War 
"M" on the public check drawn on the city' s funds. 



48 



Randy King described Reed's acquisition of artifacts, "his first project wasihe National 
Civil "War Museum, and he began buying artifacts for that, probably in the mid-90's. It got to the 
point where .he had purchased about $2 million dollars' worth of stuff, and to purchase these 
artifacts he would take money from various city accounts and council eventually found out about 
this and put road blocks up to prevent him from using public dollars, tax dollars to do this. He 
reached the point where he had acquired about $2 million dollars' worth of artifacts for the 
National Civil War Museum and [Reed's former special projects advisor] and I were very 
concerned about this, we thought he was getting out of control. So we went in and talked to him 
one night and begged him to stop and he told us he was nearly finished. Well, he was not. He 
spent a lot more. [The Civil War Museum] opened in 200O to rave reviews and kind of energized 
him to push forward with other museum projects including the National Museum, of the Old 
West, the. Pennsylvania Fire Museum, the Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame and the African 
American Museum. His artifact acquisition activities increased dramatically. By this time [city] 
council prevented him from using regular city budget funds to purchase artifacts, so they set up- a 
special projects fund at the Harrisburg Authority to funnel money through to allow the Mayor to 
continue his artifact acquisition activities." 

Mr. King testified it was his belief that by the mid-2000 's the city had collected more 
than enough artifacts to populate any ofthe proposed museums and that he began to believe that 
the purchase of the artifacts was a therapeutic personal endeavor - a personal means of stress 
management. King testified that artifact collection would occupy Reed for days on end. He 
would add acquisition of artifacts to any official trip he took. King testified that before he would 
leave for a trip, Reed would have a staffer prepare stacks of UPS slips, filled out with. City Hall's 
address and his name. When he purchased artifacts he would put them in plastic tubs, tape them 

49 . . 



up and affix theUPS label to them and, within days of Reed's departure for a given trip,. King 
testified, UPS would begin delivering tubs to city hall. King testified that there-were periods of 
time where the-office was so full of these blue plastic tubs that it was difficult for staff to 
maneuver around them. 

King testified that both he and other city officials would go to Reed on a weekly basis 
and tell him "you've got to. stop this, you've got to cut it out, it's just going to kill your career" 
but that Reed would not listen. He would simply repeat to them that he was "almost finished.'' 

King testified that he believed acquisition of artifacts was a personal release for Reed, a 
. sort of private hobby that made him happy and allowed him to feel relaxed. King expressed his 
personal view, and this Grand Jury notes he is not a clinician, that Reed suffered from depression 
which began to manifest itself in a more pronounced way in the early 2000' s. King felt that 
Reed developed a binge artifact buying "addiction" that had a salutary effect on his mood. 

King testified that it was his opinion as a member of Reed's executive staff. that Reed 
would sometimes claim to be traveling to an engagement on city business at City tax payers'' 
expense when the "real" purpose of the trip was artifact shopping. 

King testified that as the blue tubs of artifacts would come into city hall, Reed would 
have public works employees come to transport the tubs to places around the city where they 
would be stored. King testified Reed made no effort to comprehensively catalog or record the 
items bought with public money or the expenses incurred in acquiring them. 

King testified that when Reed would travel to purchase artifacts he would attempt to 
"sweet talk" the vendor into giving him possession of the artifacts in exchange for subsequent . 
payment by the city. The seller would fax a purchase order to city hall and it was King's 

50 



impression that Reed did not much, concern himself with the city requisition and payment 
procedure. 

Robert Kroboth testified before this Grand Jury. Kroboth served as the city's finance 
director, a sort of Chief Financial Officer for the city, and testified he was accordingly involved 
in accounts payable, audits, budget development and providing financial data on the business of . 
the city. 

Kroboth corroborated Lingle's testimony with respect to- the city check requisition 
procedure. Mr." Kroboth could not explain why more than half a- million dollars was paid out of 
the city capital projects fund to pay for artifacts pursuant to- the Purple Sage invoice described 
above. Mr. Kroboth testified- it was "curious" that the description of the items n-ansformed-from 
Wild Western era objects on the invoice itself to the "Civil War M" when the check itself was 
made out. ' . 

Mr. Kroboth was shown an email obtained by investigators from him to the Executive 
Director of the National Civil War Museum, in which he directed that Brett Kelly delete then 
missing THA purchased artifacts from the manifest then add them back to the manifest once they 
had been located. Mr. Kroboth was unable to remember the facts that precipitated his request to 
remove missing artifacts from the THA inventory. He assured the Grand Jury that it was not 
their intent to hide artifacts. 

Special Agent Craig LeCadre testified that agents of the Office of Attorney General 
executed a search warrant upon Stephen Reed's personal office and storage facility located in 
downtown Harrisburg. At this facility, which is a former hospital building converted for 
commercial use, Reed enjoys the use of the entire ground floor comprising some twelve (12) 

51 • 



individual rooms. In each, and every room they searched, this Grand Jury has learned;, agents 
found- artifacts and collectibles of. every description co-mingled with documents and other 
objects- and piled from the floor to the ceiling. This Grand Jury finds that Reed created in this 
suite of rooms a' veritable treasure house comprising quite literally, thousands of items which 
belonged to the people of the city of Harrisburg. 

In the first room searched, agents discovered that Reed had re-created his mayoral office 
in the largest of the commercial storage rooms. Special Agent LaCadre testified to, and this 
Grand Jury examined photographs of, this area. In- it, Reed had displayed his many civic awards 
and commendations as well as various historic artifacts including a saddle and other Western 
items. 

During the execution of this warrant, agents interviewed Stephen Reed regarding the 
contents of the rooms being searched-. Reed represented to investigators that they would not find 
any city property stored there, that the items comprised his personal collection, and in the 
unlikely event that city property was discovered, it would be because it had been "inadvertently" 
packed by city employees and brought there without his knowledge. This Grand Jury finds that 
assertion to be wholly incredible and belied by the facts as found below. 

Special Agent LeCadre testified to, and this Grand Jury examined photographs of, some 
examples of items discovered in the numerous rooms of Reed's facility. The contents of these 
rooms were not organized in any discernable way and objects and documents lay strewn in heaps 
on the floor and piled in high stacks that sometimes reached almost to the ceiling. Some of the 
items observed included a life sized sarcophagus, a full suit of armor, a suit of chain mail, a 

10 The owner of this facility provided this very large space to Reed for his 
personal and exclusive use rent free as an accommodation and out of respect 
for the former mayor. 

52 



Calvary soldier's saddle, bugle, and sword, native American items, horse and stage coach tack, 
wardrobes of uniforms from various eras including WWII and Vietnam, militaria, fa rmin g 
implements, litho- and photographs, what appeared to be a life sized buffalo head, and a host of 
other items. 

Agents of the Office of Attorney General- were obliged to spend hundreds of hours, in a 
process which is still ongging, carefully to sort through the items discovered and safeguard and 
attempt to identify them. 

To aid them in this effort, investigators contacted Brett Kelly, a curator of the National 
Civil War Museum. Mr. Kelly testified before this Grand Jury. While Reed was still in office, 
Kelly worked to catalog and inventory the stream of artifacts flowing into the city from Reed's 
sundry shopping expeditions. Particularly, Kelly would retrieve items from city' hall when they 
would arrive in shipments and would take them to the "D and D" building near the incinerator. 
He would also receive items at the "D and D" building as they were either shipped there or. 
brought by Levenda and Pickles. 

Kelly testified that the "D and D" building was a large warehouse located by the 
incinerator. The building was heated and cooled by the use of large, antiquated surplus naval 
units that often broke, rendering the temperature in the building susceptible to vast fluctuations. 
The. warehouse had large rollup garage bay entrances. that, when opened, would let in a myriad of 
insects as well as stray birds. The roof, while mostly waterproof, had sun .lights that had been 
sealed with tar which melted and dripped into the building and onto the artifacts in the summer 
months. None of these conditions were conducive to proper storage of rare historical antiquities, 
certainly not if the overarching goal was placement in a museum. Kelly recalled with deep 



53 



regret that artifacts were simply rotting at the "D and D" building. One such example to which 
he testified was when an exquisite tapestry had been brought into the "D and D' building that 
was filled with, -bright, colors and intricate designs. Within weeks, the moths had gotten to it and 
had laid their larvae within it. Shortly thereafter, the entire tapestry had become a pile of grayish 
-goo. He indicated that it was a constant struggle at the building to keep on top of all" of the 
environmental enemies to the artifacts and that the job was bigger than something that he alone 
could handle. Kelly testified that he repeatedly raised his concerns with the 'CEO of the Civil 
War Museum who then relayed those concerns to Reed. The response that Kelly got back from 
the CEO was-that he should begin to distance him self from the building and the task of caring for 
the artifacts. 

For someone who spent millions of dollars of city money on the purchase of the artifacts, 

i 

Reed did not seem to have any care or concern about them once they had been purchased. He 
did not listen to the concerns of Mr. Kelly, as relayed to him by the. CEO of the Civil War 
Museum. He did not venture to the "D and D" building when a big shipment was coming in to 
. be able to view the artifacts as they arrived. Indeed, Mr. Kelly only vaguely recalls one time in 
which Reed visited the "D and D" building in all of his service there. 

Kelly testified that in an attempt to maintain some sort of record of the great many items 
being arbitrarily purchased, Kelly began to undertake an inventory. He was able to take over a 
list that had been kept by Reed's secretary beginning in 1994 and greatly expand it to capture a 
great deal more information than it had previously included. .Kelly testified that to each item 
received by him Kelly would assign an "accession number." This number is a convention used 
in cataloging the collections of museums. Each number comprises three values separated by 
decimal points. For example, the number 2000.28.43 would indicate that the particular item was 

54 



acquired in the year 2000, was the 28- lot of items to be acquired in that year, and was the 43 r 
item within that lot. In the data base he was creating, Kelly testified, in addition to assigning 
each item an accession number, he provided a description of the item and the price the city had 
paid for that item when it could be determined from the documentation which accompanied the 
shipments. 

Mr. Kelly did his best to capture in his inventory all of the items of which he was aware. 
Mr. Kelly provided that inventory to- investigators.' 

Investigators then began to compare the items discovered in Reed's suite of storage 
rooms to those listed an the city's manifest. It should be noted, and Mr. Kelly .and other 
. witnesses testified, that the items which appear on that inventory are city property. They were 
acquired with -city money, and were shipped or delivered by city employees to a city facility. 

Over and over, investigators discovered items in Reed's personal storage facility which 
appeared on the city's manifest of city property. A spreadsheet surnmarizing those items which 
belonged to the city and were discovered in Reed's private storage facility is attached to this 
Presentment. The aggregate value of those items discovered which appear on the city's manifest 
is, so far, $121,169.20. 

Mr. Kelly testified he was shocked at the sheer scope, and number of artifacts discovered 
in Reed's storage rooms. Kelly testified he thought he had seen the extent of the Wild Western 
collection amassed by Reed but that the staggering number of items found in Reed's possession 
would be sufficient to form a museum collection all on its own. Having had the opportunity to 
survey those items discovered by OAG investigators in Reed's possession, and understanding 
that he could not identify and reliably appraise each item, Mr. Kelly nonetheless felt confident 

55 



that such, a collection, when compared -with the insured and appraised collection of the Civil War 
Museum, was. worth millions of dollars. This Grand_Iury finds Stephen Reed lied to 
investigators when he represented, that there was no city property, or -only a small amount of 
inadvertently transported city property, to be found-in his possession. To the contrary, hundreds- 
of artifacts which appear on the manifest of city property, and for which no evidence exists that 
Reed subsequently purchased or obtained lawfully, were discovered in this treasure house. 

In addition to stolen artifacts, investigators discoveredr-boxes of documents which belong- 
to the city of Harrisburg. These do not include Reed's personal papers, notes, and other 
documents, which, of course, it would have been appropriate- for Reed to take with him when he 
left office. Rather these documents comprise official correspondence, memoranda of 
negotiation, and other records which belonged to the city and are part of its institutional memory. 

A warrant was also executed at Reed's, three story private residence in the city of 
Harrisburg. Even having seen and cataloged the vast collection secreted away by Reed at his 
storage building, investigators testified they were shocked by what they found. Thousands more 
artifacts, many of an American Western theme, were densely packed into the living spaces, 
basement, and along stairwells and hallways. Statuary, oil paintings, pottery, weapons, clothing 
a 'vampire hunting kit,' and all manner of other items were displayed on table tops, walls, in 
.cabinets, on the floor and on top of television sets and firrniture. Some items still had tags from 
the City's auction of Western memorabilia attached. Both auction houses corifirmed to the 
Grand Jury that no record existed of any auction purchases by Stephen Reed. The process of 
cataloging these items is ongoing, but many items found in Reed's home appear on the manifest 
of city property referenced above. 



56 



Additionally, this Grand Jury heard testimony that in the period between the search of 
Reed's storage facility and the search of his home, Reed travelled to Gettysburg to attempt to sell 
a number of firearms on consignment. Investigators recovered those weapons, and at the times 
of this presentment, at least twenty appear on the list of city property. In a television interview 
played for this Grand Jury, Reed asserts that all the artifacts found in his home belong to him. 

In conclusion, this Grand Jury finds that Reed exercised control over the municipal 
enterprises described above to such a degree that they became mere ciphers. 

We find that Reed improperly diverted proceeds from bond offerings which were 
themselves ill-advised, portions of which were used to fill the coffers or reimburse the City so 
that Mr. Reed could pursue his interests. In every instance, bonds were sold for one purpose and 
some of the proceeds spent on another purpose. This diversion was actively hidden from 
investors and the citizens of Harrisburg. Transparency- and competition for city business were 
subverted in favor of obfuscation and patronage. Debt which encumbers Harrisburg to this- day 
was heedlessly issued to enable the purchase of artifacts and to pay select professionals. We find 
that Reed offered things of value to officials in exchange for the discharge of their official duties 
and to bring them to heel. We find that Reed improperly retained possession of a massive 
collection of city property at the expense of the city and its creditors. Ultimately, Reed began to 
treat-the city's assets as his own and. to build a city which was a monument to him and not 
administered for the. common good. 



57 



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2000.107.3 . 


2000.111.86 • I 


1995.290.3 | 


2001.60.3 I 


2006.47.8 6 


2001.106.7 ( 


2002.215.43 1 


2000.112.50 | 


2000.65.146 I 


1995.391.43 I 


1997.71.56 1 


2003.33.4 | 


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1995.62.14 I 


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1995.62.4 ' ,- \ 


1995.62.13 j 


1995.62.15 


1995.62.16 ! | 


1995.62.17 • [■ 


1995.62.19 ■ 8. 


1995.62.23 1 


1995.62.24 . 1 


1995.62.3 1 


1995.62.5 . 1 


2002.206.38 • 1 


1994.30.1 1 


1994.9.13a | 


1994.9.13b 


1994.9.13c '! 


1994.9.13d | 


1995.97.2 


1995.97.33 | 


1995.97.22 . . 1 


1995.97.37 j 


1995.97.40 j 


1995.97.29 I 


1996.17.37 1 


1997.94.40 | 






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$26.00 I 


$178.00 1 


$26.00 I 


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$125.00 | 


i Hat in box 


a/Full Body ■ 


lg Lamp Glass Painted Shade 


in Colonial Cross 


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tone Epitaph, Aug. 13, 1880 . | 


tone Epitaph, Aug 29, 1880 . | 


imbstone Epitaph, Aug 7, 1880 | 


tone Epitaph, June 30, 1880 ■ | 


imbstone Epitaph, Aug. 8, 188Q | 


tone Epitaph, Sept 30, 1881 • • •■ | 


t'pne Epitaph, Dec 4, 1880 | 


tone Epitaph, May 2, 1.882 | 


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sper, Bodie Morning News, Bodie Calif. 1880 | 


;one Epitaph (19th Century) | 


:one Epitaph (19th Century) | 


:one Epitaph (19th Century) | 


:one Epitaph (19th Century) . • • | 


:wspaper, Daily Denver Times, July 19, 1881 "Billy The Kid" 


iper, Niles' Weekly Register, Bait, Apr. 30, 1 836 | 


Newspaper, Nebraska Stamp News, Fremont, July, 1 890 | 


Newspaper, The Denver Tribune,' Colo., Aug. 2, 1881 | 


iper, The Denver Daily Times, July 25, 1 88 1 | 


Newspaper, The Daily Denver Times, Jan. 19, 1882 | 


iper, Niles' Weekly Register, Bait, Apr. 2, 1 83 6 | 


Newspaper, Harpers Monthly, March, 1883 OK Corral | 


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12003.52.75 I 


12002.206.65 | 


12002.206.64 1 


12002.206.67 I 


1 1997.71.94 | 


1 1997.71.89 I 


1 1997.71.82 J 


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1996.131.13 | 


1997.71.91 i 


1997.71.52 1 


1997.71.50 j 


2003.52.7 j 


1997.10.64 1 


1997.10.67 | 


2001.23.1 1 


1997.10.57 j 


1997.10.53 1 


1997.10.50 1 


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1997.10.45 


1997.10.38 J 


1997.10.36 j 


1997.10.29 1 


1997.10.27 | 


1997.10.28 


1997.10.22 


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| Daily Independent 1874 


|Newspaper, Morning Appeal, 1880 


|Newspaper, Lyon County Times, Silver City, NV., 1874 


jNewspaper, Eureka Daily Leader, NV. 1878 


|Newspaper, The Daily State Register, Carson City, NV., 1§7 1 


| Eureka Daily Sentinel 1875 


| Western Liberal 1892 '\ 


[ Albuquerque Morning Journal 1 884'. j 


Newspaper, New Mexico Interpreter, White OaksN.M., 1890 


Newspaper, The Borderer, Las Cruces, NM, 1872 | 


Carson Dally Appeal 1874 ■ | 


Arizona Daily Star 1880 | 


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Newspaper, Weekly Arizonan 1879 | 


Newspaper, The Daily Austin Republican, Texas, July 2, 1869. | 


Newspaper, Marysville Daily Appeal, Calif., May 1, 1873 | 


Spanish Armor . V-I 


Newspaper, The Times-Review, Tuscarora, Nevada, Apr. 29, 1881 


Newspaper, Sentipel, Auguache, Colo., Jan. 2, 1890 | 


Newspaper, Flalce's Bulletin, Galveston, Texas, Dec. 19, 186(6) 


Newspaper, The Sentinel, Red Bluff, Calif., Mai- 22, 1873 "'The 
MoaocWar" 


Northwestern Livestock Journal, Cheyenne, Wyoming,- Jan. 18, 
1889 " 


Newspaper, Houston Tri- Weeldy Telegraph, Texas, Jan. 3, 1866 


Newspaper, The Maiysville Daily Appeal, Calif., June 17, 1871 


Newspaper, The ArizonaDaily Star, Tucson, Nov. 23, 1880 | 


Newspaper, Georgetown Gazette, Calif., July 24, 1885 | 


Newspaper, Suppliment To Flake's .Gavesfan Weeldy Bulletin, Sep. 
5, 1864 


Newspaper, The Times-Review, Tuscarora, Nevada, July 3, 1882 


Newspaper, Marysville Daily Appeal, Calif., Oct. 25, 1 863 | 


Newspaper, Desert Evening News, SaltLalce City, Oct 23, 1891 , 


Newspaper, Houston Tri- Weekly Telegraph, Texas, Dec. 13, 1865 


Newspaper, Daily Ogden Junction, Utah, Oct. 10, 1879 | 


Z.6/S0/90 1 


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12/09/94 


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12/09/94 


12/09/94 


12/09/94 


1 12/09/94. 1 


1 12/09/94 | 


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iDecember 18, 1874 


| April 11, 1880 | 


|Novemberl5, 1874 . | 


IDecember 17, 1878 | 


| March 26, 1871 1 


(February 23, 1875 | 


1 August 26, 1892 ' | 


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November 23, 1872 * I 


December 20, 1874 I 


October 20, 1880 | 


December 7 B 187^ 1 


December 26, 1879 | 






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[1997.10.6 J 


1997.10.3 1 


1997.10.1 1 


1997.10.31 . S 


1997.10.32 ' ! 


1997.10.33 1 


1997.10.34 J 


1997.10.63 I 


1997.10.65 J 


1997.10.66 ! 


1997.10.68 j 


1997.10.69 ■ 


1997.10.58 J 


1997.10.60 . 1 


1997.10.62- 8 


1997.10.51 • |. 


1997.10.59 ' | 


1997.10.43' 1 


1997.10.44 ' 1 


1997.10.39.- 1 


1 997.10.40 ■■ 1 


1997.10.35.'- 


1997.10.30 1 


1997.10.20 | 


1997.10.13 


1997.10.55- 


1997.10.26- - 


2003.33.3 I 


2000.29.4 1 


2001.107.7 1 


None 1 


1995.361.7' I 


2006.24.1 j 


1997.25.6 | 


1998.70.1 J 


1998.44.17 J 


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$21.00 


$8.00 


$9.50 -| 


$8.00 | 


$47.00 


$15.00 . | 


$16.00 • J 


$27.00 | 


$18.00 ; | 


$5.50 | 


$27.00 . | 


$8.00 | 


$16.00 • .| 


$9.00 


$6.00 . 


$38.00 ' | 


$15.00 . | 


$38.00 


$9.00 ■ 


$45.00 


$200.00 | 


$2,700.00 | 


$277.00 | 




$63.00 | 


$850.00 ■ | 


$75.00 ' | 


$70.00 


$1,900.00 | 


Newspaper, The Denison News, Texas, Feb 20, 1 873 


Newspaper, Hie Stock Exchange, San Francisco, June, 1875 


Newspaper, Marysville Daily Appeal, Calif. June 14, 1 87 1 ■ . . 


Newspaper, Daily Momirig Call, San Francisco, Mar 17, 1873 


Newspaper, Daily Morning Call, SanFrancisco, Mar 18, 1873 


Newspaper, Daily Morning Call, San Francisco, Apr. 26, -.1 873 


Newspaper, The Yreka Union, Calif. Oct 12, 1872 


Newspaper, TheLone'OalcNews, Texas, Jan. 24, 1890 .- | 


Newspaper, Desert Evening News, Salt Lake City, Nov. 12,- 1889 


Newspaper, Sacramento Union -Suppliment, Feb. 2,1859 | 


Newspaper, Sacramento Daily Union, Calif, Oct. 26, 1867 ' | 


Newspaper, The Idaho Weeldy Statesman, Boise City, LT.-Aug. 4, 
1877 


Newspaper, Desert Evening News, Oct. 27, 1876 | 


Newspaper, The Salt LakeDaily Herald, Utah, Oct. 8, 1874' | 


Newspaper, Tie Salt Lalce Daily Herald, Aug 31, 1877 | 


newspaper, DesertEvening News, Sept. 20, 1876 ' | 


Newspaper, The Leavenworth Tiroes, Kansas, Oct. 30, 1881 | 


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Newspaper, Evening Telegraph, Houston, Dec. 6, 1866 . | 


Newspaper, Daily Morning Call, Nov. 14, 1873 • | 


Newspaper, Nevada'Daily Transcript, Nevada City, Calif, June 26 
1876 


Newspaper, The Eweekly Iiuttonian, Tekamah, Nebraska, Aug 26, 
1880 • . * ' ■ •• 


Newspaper, D&ily Morning Call, San Francisco, July 30,- 1873 | 


Newspaper, Salt Lake' Daily Tribune, Utah, Apr. 23, 1874 | 


Newspaper, The Weekly Boomerang, Laramie, Wyoming, Jan. 21, 
1886 


Newspaper, The Marysville Daily Appeal, Calif., Dec. 25, 1872 


Newspaper, Lincoln County Leader, White Oalcs, NM, June 4, 
1887 


FerKer Tool Box ' | 


Pharo Table, Portable | 


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Newspaper, Harper's Weekly, Apr. 10, 1886 (Geronimo) | 


Andirons (3239) • . | 


Conestoga-Brake Shoe | 


photo postcard "Potato Creek Johnny" 


Memoirs of S.P. Allea, 1870-80 under G. Crook 5th Calvary | 


1 12/09/94 


1 12/09/94 


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1 12/09/94 


1 12/09/94 


1 12/09/94 


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12/09/94 1 


12/09/94 | 


12/09/94 


12/09/94 I 


12/09/94 -| 


12/09/94 | 


12/09/94 | 


12/09/94 | 


12/09/94 | 


i 2/09/94 | 


12/09/94 | 


.12/09/94 


12/09/94 . 


12/09/94 | 


12/09/94 | 


12/09/94 


12/09/94 


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1 — [ 


08/25/02 | 


05/05/00 | 


08/31/01 1 




09/13/95 | 


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06/10/97 | 


09/02/98 


08/11/98 | 





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appearfe to be driftwood | 


Chain Mail Shirt | 




horizontal iron bars for logs for fire | 








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1 1998.94.48 1 


2001.113.19 . 


2001.78.10 1 


2002.41.474a I 


2006.24.17 1 


2002.53.20 1 


2003.2.1 I 


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2000.109.2 I 


1998.52.88 I 


1994.8.15 I 


1994.8.18 I 


2002.41.277 


2006.11.3 1 


2000.39.2 


1997.51.1 • | 


2003.54.26 1 


2000.31.5 1 


1997.35.3 | 


1997.35-.1 . I 


1997.35,2 . 1 


1998.48.5 • 1 


1997.85.1 ■ : 1 


2000.44.4 1 


1998.43.2 


1999.70.3 ! 


1998.43.1' I 


1998.45:2 




2000.87.15 1 


1998.30.6 I 


1997.45.8 1 


1997.45.3 I- 


1998.30.5 | 


1997.45.2 i 


1997.45.1 1 


1997.45.4 i 


1997.45.7 | 


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$550.00 


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$125.00 


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$165.00 | 


$2,000.00 


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$1,350.00 | 


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$700.00 | 


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$450.00 | 


$180.00 


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$2,376.00 1 


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Western Union Telegraph Pole Framfe W/Wooden Pegs | 






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imarked Iron 




















| lumber saws (2 man) two 


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1 19th Cent. Childs High- Chair (Payson; AZ) 


|lron and Wood Rope Pulley For Lifting Timbers 


[Double Beam Scale' ■■ 


[iron Bell 


Genuine Porter Saddle 


Pair Conestoga Tar Horns 


Large Hand Cutting Saw 


Virginia City MT way bill 


Sacramento Newspaper Jan- June 1 882 


Sacramento Newspaper July-Dec 1881 


Antique Wooden Barrel 


Cavalry Saddle Set 


Geronimo by Mary E. Fly Tombstone, Arizona Ten 


Desk, School .• .• 


Photograph, 5th U.S'. Infantry Ft. Keogh, MT Terr. 


Mining Stock Receipt 


Crystal PaMce liquor license 


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1896 Indian Territory J3 ill Doolin Gang 


Photo of Indian Burial Ground w/discount 


Photograph, Bill Dalfbn & Marshall Lidsey 


Albumen Cowboys on horseback Old West Livery ! 
1880s 


photo blacksmith shop 


Glass negative of Flathead Village David C Walker 


photo Schimpah, Daughter of Spokane 


American Made Rev. War Cannon Ca. 1776 30" Ui 
Cannon 


Kiowa Girl ID C. 1903 


1900 Peru Mining Letter-great content 


Missouri Convict's letter 


Governor's Rifle Duel letter 


Early 1 868 Idaho Territory letter 


US Commissioner's Complaint 


Arizona Territory Court Document 


1865 Kansas Letter . '• 


Indian-Mining payroll 


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108/08/97 


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11" Seat, Canteen, Bugle, SaddleBag, Rifle Scabbard, 
Ammunition Puch with (1) bullet, U.S>/C.E.E. 1865 Swoi 
in Metal Holder '* 




























































Co.Phoenix, AZ. 


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1 5" diameter pully 


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|U.S.N. 


[ From Reed's Office N.Porter 


|('l) Railhead Saloon (1) Saloc 


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Way Bill #23 Sept 26, 1891 






14" diameter 23 ,l tall with lid 




Full school desk with chair 


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Indian Territory Southern District Oct.4,1902 1 






S.T.Dminer,for State Senator 1 


Opt 16,1890 for $62.35 I 


Chief Lone Feather's Wife seated in front with blanlcet 


In front of house with fence 1 


25 1/2 inches 1 


27 inches 1 


Fort Ellis, Montana Tejxitory Receipt | 


Early California Ghost Town Invoice • . | 


June 27,1891 • | 


copy/3 pages handwritten I 




Choteau County, Montana Territory; Office of the County 
Clerk 


Handwritten document listing "calves.bulls steers, 
Mexican/Cattle Sanitary Board 


Arizona Territory 1 905 pre-printed time check | 


Custer Memorial Monument 1 894 | 






December 4, 1907 in front of Bill's Hotel Irma | 


letter coticerns location certificate for Michigan load | 


Chief and Son Burial Crround I 


May 14,1883 I 


4 1/2 pages October 8, 1884 | 


Granted June 26 s l 890 license number 40679 | 


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May 29,1845 . . 1 




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Prepan 
File No 



2002.29.7 


1996.109.13. 


1998.44.13 


1998.44.14 1 


2001.80.5 1 


1997.42.4 1 


1997.47.2 1 


2000.44.15 I 


1997.73.3 i 


J3 
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rn 

CO 

in 

GN 
CN 


1997.53.5 | 


1997.53.4 I 


1997.42.5 


2000.28.19 J 


2006.24.21 1 


> — 1 

IN 

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CN 
O 
O 
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1995.516.52 1 


2002.220.33 1 


0 
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■* 
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cn 
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2001.31.8 


1998.45.5a 1 


a 

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vi 

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on 
Cn 


1998.45.5b 1 


CO 
ON 
ON 


1998.45.5c 1 


1998.45.5cc ! 


■0 
in 
in 

CO 
ON 
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in 
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ON 


0 
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1998.45.5ff 1 


bo 
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On 


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in 
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1 998.45 .5i 1 


in 
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1998.45.51 j 






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$25.00 


$75.00 


$110.00 


$250.00 


$450.00 


$225.00 


$950.00 


$350.00 j 


$25.00 | 


o 
o 
vi 

CN 

in 

69 


0 


$875.00 | 


$325.00 


$100.00 1 


$48.00 | 


$35.00 . | 


$800.00 ' | 


cn 
in 
01 

69 


$140.00 I 


$29.00 | 


$50.00 | 


$50.00 | 


$50.00 . | 


$50.00 | 


$50.00 • | 


$50.00 | 


$50.00 1 


$50.00 | 


$50.00 | 


$50.00 | 


$50.00 | 


$50.00 | 


$50.00 I 


$50.00 | 


$50.00 | 


$50.00 | 


$50.00 | 


$50.00 | 


$50.00 


$50.00 


Colorado - Wells Fargo Letter ' 


Jose Francisco Aragon quarto, US Army Requisition, Santa F.e,-NM 
May 20, 1850 


B Bill stereo card • 


Sitting Blill Camp Ft Randall stereo 


Sombrero w/Silver Hat Band 


Two Indian men, no Photo I.D. 


Navajo Chief Manuelito & his Tribe, ca 1 865 albumen .• • j 


Photograph, Lawman R. Ewing w/Body | 


Charles Shibell Document | 


2 original photographs of Sioux. Indians cl 880 • | 


original snap shot of Jim Thorpe cl930-40 • | 


original photograph of outlaw AI Jennings c!9 15 . | 


Indian women w/child by Parker/photo .. 


Coffee Pot, Gray Cowboy, Very Large | 


Pair Copper & Brass Candelabras ; • '• | 


Large Woq'den Carpenters Clamp . | 


Badge US Ind police • •'' ' | 


Moulding Plane ;"■ | 


Remington Done in Open • • ■ | 


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1 890's Texas Warrant. ■ . ' . 


1 890's Texas Warrant ' '• • • 1 


1 890's Texas Warranf : -f 1 


1890's Texas Warrant ■ ' | 


1890's Texas Warrant. •. | 


189Q's Texas Warrant • | 


1 890's Texas Warrant •■ | 


1890's Texas Warrant . | 


1890's Texas Warrant • | 


1890's Texas- Warrant ■• ■ . | 


1890's Texas Warrant | 


1890's Tpcas Warrant | 


1890's Texas Warrant | 


1890's Texas Warrant | 


1890's Texas Warrant . .| 


1890's Texas Warrant | 


1890's Texas Warrant | 


1890's Texas Warrant | 


1890's Texas Warrant 


1890's Texas Warrant 


1 02/09/02 


11/05/96- 


|08/ll/98 


08/11/98 


1 08/20/01 


1 11/16/97. 


|l 1/03/97 


1 05/05/00 | 


|06/06/97 


11/12/97 | 


11/12/97 1 


11/12/97 | 


11/16/97 


05/05/00 1 


. 90/LZ/L0\ 


09/04/01 J 


08/12/95 | 


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08/11/98 



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additionally territory of Colorado complaint for horse thief 
July 29, 1864 


|Buffalo Bill Mounted and shooting BBWW1893 | 


1 882 Sitting Bull Camp Prisoner' | 


[with horseshoe Maker Pigalle ' 1 




! Wife wearing a Child's Blanket 1 8 65 | 


Rutledge Ewing on the police force | 


March 1 0, 1 879 letter from Sheriff Charles Shibell | 


2 original photos and 2 copies of Siouxlndians cl880 . | 




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packing slip marked paid/letter to Steve Reed with copies of 
photos from George Polalcoff dated November 2, 1997 














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1998.45.5o 


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1998.45.5q 


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2002.43.2 


2000.44.18 • I 


1996.28.2 ' 1 


1995.295.10a - ! 


1995.295.10b ■ | 


1995.295.10c 1 


1995.295.10d '• I 


1995.295.10e 1 


1995.295. lOf , J 


1995.295.10g • S 


1 995.295. 10h ' 1 


2000.35.62 | 


1995.292.16a 1 


1995.292.16b . I 


2001.78.17 ■ I 


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2002.221.13 ■ I 


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1998.46.7c I 


1998.46.7d | 


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i$320,"00- ■ 1 1 


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$160.00 1 


$925.00 . | 


$265.00 1 


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$400.00 | 


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1 890's Texas Warrant 


1890's Texas Warrant 


1890's Texas Warrant 


1 8 90's Texas Warrant 


1890's Texas Warrant 


1890's Texas Warrant • ; 


1890's Texas Warrant' 


1890's Texas Wan-ant 


Copper Ladle 


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letter-Indian Fighter Geo. P. Buell Ft. Stanton 1881 | 


Brand | 


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Brand .. • | 


Bag 1 #56 • ■ | 


Stick brand | 


Stick brand | 


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3 original photographs cl890 of Crow Indians | 


Meat Hooks on Pirie Pole | 


Cowboy Riding Crop, bone handle | 


Bone Handled "Colo. Toothpick Leadville" Dagger | 


Ghost Dance Beaded Medicine Pouch & Circular w/Mediciiie 
Symbols 


Rug, Two Grey Hills | 


Horse Collar From CO Ranch ' | 


Horse Collar From CO Ranch | 


Horse Collar From CO Ranch | 


Horse Collar From CO Ranch . | 


Horse Collar From. CO Ranch | 


Horse Collar From CO Ranch | 


horse collar decorative pulling pads | 


08/1 J/98 


08/11/98 


86/11/80 


08/11/98 


1 86/11/80 


08/11/98 


08/11/98 


08/11/98 


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08/11/98 


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08/11/98 


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03/01/02 


05/05/00 


03/04/96 


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11/11/02 


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08/30/02 


07/27/05 : 


1 08/26/98 |: 


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one piece strainer, one piece' solid 




September 20, 1895 ,| 


Various brands 




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With cork plug and rope handle | 


cl880 with 3 photocopies marked 1890's | 


One meat hook ■ . | 


with leather handle and leather fringes | 


With sheath | 




"Contemporary" Saddle blanlcet 27" x 33" | 


Horse/Mule Collar with iron rings 


leather buekel, wood trim with metal rings | 




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|2002.58.3 • | 


(2002.58.5 8 


1 1995.504.26c | 


1.2002.41.494 J 


|.1998.94.30 J 


[2001.63.7 ■ • J 


1995.314.105 | 


2001.106.2 J 


1998.93.6 1 


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1995.299.5 | 


2000.59.47 I 






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|$155.00 


($175.00 


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| $300.00 


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|$157.50 


| $250.00 


|$300.00 | 


!$125.00 | 


$10,000.00 | 


$1,800.00 | 


$300.00 | 


$50.00 


|Mule Collar, Chestnut Double Mule Collar W/Iron 1860 


I'Mule collar, Double Mule Collar, Chestaut & Iron 1880 


| Jesse James Magazine 


1 150 Pound Anvil ' 


| Platform .scales w/weights . . 


(Mexican Bit 


Boots ■ ] 


iBeaded SIcull . . 


US marked canvas covered qanteeh, Indian Wars | 


Set of 4 Stagecoach Harness '. . | 


Saloon #10 Spitoon & Chuclc-a-Luck • | 


Sioux stretch-neck turtle rattle • | 


Stove, Black 1890 Stove 


1 02/05/02 


1 02/05/02. 


1 12/09/35 . 


1 09/04/01 


1 11/14/98 


|08/15/01 


08/14/95 


! 09/08/01 | 


11/10/98 | 


02/01/96 | 


08/27/01 | 


08/08/95 | 


05/05/00 








0.492 






















I Hoop Yoke 46" 


iHoop Yoke 52" 


June 7, 1882 The Wide Awake Library 5 cents/N 


Ivulcil anvil 100 lb (www.iforgeiron.com) 


| Victor Antique Platform Scale w/o weights 




Civil War Officers/PVT Boots 














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Accession 
number 


1995.546.5 


1995.308.17 • ■ 


2003.33.17 


2001.3.19 


1994.30,18 


2003.59.356 






Code 


fS 
















Price 


$70.00 


$1,300.00 


$15,000.00 


$50.00 


$9.00 


$60.00 






City description 


US mess kit, tin cup, knife & fork (4 pc) 


Cheyenne Indian Bag 


1 880;S Lakota Society Rattle 


« 
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Newspaper, Maiysville Daily Appeal, Calif. July 28j 1878 


Book, Billy The Kid 






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08/25/02 


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OAG description . 












booldet by John L. Poe 






House Area 
Location / 
Item No. 




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